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I am trying to use Mockito to mock a "Reader" type class. Think of a data stream reader, it has methods to read various data types and advance the internal pointer after each read.

public interface Reader {
    int readInt();
    short readShort();
}

The class being tested reads in various data structures from the data stream. For example,

public class Somethings {
    public List<Something> somethings;

    public Somethings(Reader reader) {
        somethings = new List<Something>();
        int count = reader.readInt();
        for (int i=0; i<count; i++) {
            somethings.add(readSomething(reader));
        }
    }

    private Something readSomething(Reader reader) {
        int a = reader.readInt();
        short b = reader.readShort();
        int c = reader.readInt();
        return new Something(a, b, c);
    }
}

And finally, I have my test:

public class SomethingsTest {
    @Test
    public void testSomethings() {
        Reader reader = Mockito.mock(Reader.class);

        readCount(reader, 2);
        readSomething(reader, 1, 2, 3);
        readSomething(reader, 4, 5, 6);

        Somethings somethings = new Somethings(reader);
        Assert.assertEqual(2, somethings.size());
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(1, 2, 3), somethings.somethings.get(0));
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(4, 5, 6), somethings.somethings.get(1));
    }

    private void readCount(Reader reader, int count) {
        when(reader.readInt()).thenReturn(count);
    }

    private void readSomething(Reader reader, int a, short b, int c) {
        when(reader.readInt()).thenReturn(a);
        when(reader.readShort()).thenReturn(b);
        when(reader.readInt()).thenReturn(c);
    }
}

Unfortunately, this does not work. reader.readInt() always returns 6 for every invocation. And I understand why it returns 6. That is not my question.

There are two options I can think of to fix the tests, but I don't particularly like either one.

The first option would be something like:

public class SomethingsTest {
    @Test
    public void testSomethings() {
        Reader reader = Mockito.mock(Reader.class);

        when(reader.readInt())
            .thenReturn(2)
            .thenReturn(1)
            .thenReturn(3)
            .thenReturn(4)
            .thenReturn(6);
        when(reader.readShort())
            .thenReturn(2)
            .thenReturn(5);

        Somethings somethings = new Somethings(reader);
        Assert.assertEqual(2, somethings.size());
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(1, 2, 3), somethings.somethings.get(0));
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(4, 5, 6), somethings.somethings.get(1));
    }
}

This should work, but it's very monolithic and messy. It's difficult to see which return is for which piece of which structure, because they're all intermixed, with no structure.

The second option I can think of is something like:

public class SomethingsTest {
    @Test
    public void testSomethings() {
        Reader reader = Mockito.mock(Reader.class);

        NewOngoingStubbing readIntStub = when(reader.readInt());
        NewOngoingStubbing readShortStub = when(reader.readShort());

        readCount(readIntStub, 2);
        readSomething(readIntStub, readShortStub, 1, 2, 3);
        readSomething(readIntStub, readShortStub, 4, 5, 6);

        Somethings somethings = new Somethings(reader);
        Assert.assertEqual(2, somethings.size());
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(1, 2, 3), somethings.somethings.get(0));
        Assert.assertEquals(new Something(4, 5, 6), somethings.somethings.get(1));
    }

    private void readCount(NewOngoingStubbing readIntStub, int count) {
        readIntStub.thenReturn(count);
    }

    private void readSomething(NewOngoingStubbing readIntStub,
            NewOngoingStubbing  readShortStub, int a, short b, int c) {
        readIntStub.thenReturn(a);
        readShortStub.thenReturn(b);
        readIntStub.thenReturn(c);
    }
}

This at least maintains the structure of the original, but having to pass a separate object for each method call you want to make on the stubbed object is... ugh.

What would be the cleanest way to perform this test? Is there some option I'm missing here? Some functionality that I can leverage? I just started using Mockito tonight.. so I could very well be missing something.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may create a class to deal with it, e.g.

private static class ReaderStubber {
    private final Reader reader = Mockito.mock(Reader.class);
    private final NewOngoingStubbing readIntStub = when(reader.readInt());;
    private final NewOngoingStubbing readShortStub = when(reader.readShort());;

    public Reader getReader() {
        return reader;
    }    

    private void readCount(int count) {
        readIntStub.thenReturn(count);
    }

    private void readSomething(int a, short b, int c) {
        readIntStub.thenReturn(a);
        readShortStub.thenReturn(b);
        readIntStub.thenReturn(c);
    }   
}

But then the question is, do you really need to do this with Mockito? Not everything should be mocked. Maybe just implementing a stub Reader for the test with some List<Integer> inside is better.


(Edit) Also, if this is possible, maybe you should redesign the Reader to make it immutable and return some NewOngoingReading. Frequently (but not always) things that are hard to test are better to redesign. Also, you will not need to deal with synchronization.

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Hmm, Good idea, although you do have a point regarding if using Mockito is worth it in this case. I would probably go with something more like: private void readInt(int val) { readIntStub.thenReturn(val); }. –  JesusFreke Oct 27 '12 at 10:50

Mockito does ongoing stubbing natively. Your first example is fine, but this should also work:

when(reader.readInt()).thenReturn(2, 1, 3, 4, 6);

The documentation for it is here.

If you have something handling particularly complex interaction, it's OK to roll out your own stub class. You may find that initialising some fake with realistic data, then using that, provides a clearer example of how the classes collaborate than Mockito can. If that's the case, go with clarity over convention. Mockito is IMO the best mocking framework out there, but sometimes I still roll my own.

share|improve this answer
    
Like I mentioned, I know either of the 2 alternatives I mentioned would work, but I don't care for either one. Just changing a series of .thenReturn(1).thenReturn(2) to .thenReturn(1, 2) doesn't in any way improve the structure of it :) –  JesusFreke Oct 27 '12 at 10:44
    
Hence why I suggested rolling your own as an alternative. –  Lunivore Oct 27 '12 at 16:35

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