Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose we have this class:

class X {
public:
    explicit X (char* c) { cout<<"ctor"<<endl; init(c); };
    X (X& lv)  { cout<<"copy"<<endl;  init(lv.c_); };
    X (X&& rv) { cout<<"move"<<endl;  c_ = rv.c_; rv.c_ = nullptr; };

    const char* c() { return c_; };

private:
    void init(char *c) { c_ = new char[strlen(c)+1]; strcpy(c_, c); };
    char* c_;

};

and this sample usage:

X x("test");
cout << x.c() << endl;
X y(x);
cout << y.c() << endl;
X z( X("test") );
cout << z.c() << endl;

The output is:

ctor
test
copy
test
ctor   <-- why not move?
test

I am using VS2010 with default settings. I'd expect the last object (z) to be move-constructed, but it's not! If I use X z( move(X("test")) ); then the last lines of the output are ctor move test, as I'd expect. Is it a case of (N)RVO?

Q: Should the move-ctor be called according to the standard? If so, why isn't it called?

share|improve this question
2  
It's copy elision. If copy elision failed, then a move would happen. Why does your post title say "default constructor preferred"? No default constructor is being called, and nothing is being preferred in place of the move constructor. It is being eliminated entirely. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 27 '12 at 11:13
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you are seeing is copy elision, which allows the compiler to directly construct a temporary into a target it is to be copied/moved into and thus elide a copy (or move) constructor/destructor pair. The situations in which the compiler is allowed to apply copy elision are specified in §12.8.32 of the C++11 standard:

When certain criteria are met, an implementation is allowed to omit the copy/move construction of a class object, even if the copy/move constructor and/or destructor for the object have side effects. In such cases, the implementation treats the source and target of the omitted copy/move operation as simply two different ways of referring to the same object, and the destruction of that object occurs at the later of the times when the two objects would have been destroyed without the optimization. This elision of copy/move operations, called copy elision, is permitted in the following circumstances (which maybe combined to eliminate multiple copies):

  • in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object with
    the same cv-unqualified type as the function return type, the
    copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the automatic
    object directly into the function’s return value
  • in a throw-expression, when the operand is the name of a non-volatile automatic object whose scope does not extend beyond the end of the innermost enclosing try-block (if there is one), the copy/move operation from the operand to the exception object (15.1) can be omitted by constructing the automatic object directly into the exception object
  • when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with he same cv-unqualified type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the temporary object directly into the target of the
    omitted copy/move
  • when the exception-declaration of an exception handler (Clause 15) declares an object of the same type (except for cv-qualification) as
    the exception object (15.1), the copy/move operation can be omitted
    bytreatingthe exception-declaration as an alias for the exception
    object if the meaning of the program will be unchanged except for the execution of constructors and destructors for the object declared by
    the exception-declaration.
share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide a simple example not using std::move that'd force the compiler to use the move constructor? –  elmes Oct 27 '12 at 11:17
    
@elmes: Why would you want the move constructor to be called, when it is unnecessary to do so? –  Grizzly Oct 27 '12 at 11:19
2  
@elmes: X z((rand() % 2) ? X("test") : X("TEST")); –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 27 '12 at 11:26
1  
@Grizzly: C++11 demands that when copy-elision would be possible (you return a same-type object from a function), every return local_var; will first try to move local_var. No need for explicit moves, which would hamper (N)RVO. –  Xeo Oct 27 '12 at 11:36
2  
@Xeo: I don't follow. The standard might allow copy elision even in the described cases, however whether the compiler can do it, exspecially if the lifetimes overlap, is questionable. And where did I say that an explicit move would ever be needed (or desierable) when returning a local variable? –  Grizzly Oct 27 '12 at 11:42
show 2 more comments

The ctor output you get in your third code line is for the construction of the temporary object. After that, indeed, the temporary is moved into the new variable z. In such a situation the compiler may choose to elide the copy/move, and it seems that is what it did.

The Standard states:

(§12.8/31) When certain criteria are met, an implementation is allowed to omit the copy/move construction of a class object, even if the copy/move constructor and/or destructor for the object have side effects. [...] This elision of copy/move operations, called copy elision, is permitted in the following circumstances (which may be combined to eliminate multiple copies):
[...]
- when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the temporary object directly into the target of the omitted copy/move
[...]

One important condition is that the source object and the destination are of the same type (apart from cv-qualification, i.e. things like const).

Therefore, one way you can force the move constructor to be called is to combine the object initialization with implicit type conversion:

#include <iostream>

struct B
{};

struct A
{
  A() {}
  A(A&& a) {
    std::cout << "move" << std::endl;
  }
  A(B&& b) {
    std::cout << "move from B" << std::endl;
  }
};


int main()
{
  A a1 = A(); // move elided
  A a2 = B(); // move not elided because of type conversion
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You are calling X's char* constructor X("test") explicitly.

Therefore it is printing ctor

share|improve this answer
1  
And then calling X's move constructor when declaring z. –  Xeo Oct 27 '12 at 11:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.