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I have two sets of lat/lng coordinates and visually I draw a line betwen them. Is there a way of deducing the lat/lng coordinates as you "walk" along the line

so at 10% along the line the lat/lng will be

at 20% along the line the lat/lng will be

at 30% along the line the lat/lng will be

etc..

I was hoping the geography stuff in sql may have an easy solution..

Ideally in SQL (SQL Server 2008 R2 Database) or - if too tricky - possibly in C#

Any help would be appreciated

Thanks

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Is the line on the surface of a sphere or in flatland? –  James Oct 27 '12 at 11:45
    
It just two locations in a country - if that helps - could be anywhere in that country - so between two cities for instance –  A B Oct 27 '12 at 11:48
    
What line do you walk ? A loxodrome (rhumb line) or an orthodrome (geodesic, great circle), some other line ? –  High Performance Mark Oct 27 '12 at 11:49
    
A straight line - as the crow flies - will suffice - As you can tell geo stuff (and terminology) is not my strong point - imagine its a straight line on google maps between two locations. Sorry if Im not explaining this correctly –  A B Oct 27 '12 at 11:53
    
It would be trivial were we to assume the crow can fly above Mt Everest, and if you never cross the poles or the -180/180 line. –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 27 '12 at 11:56

3 Answers 3

This library in C# provides a lot of tools that might help:

http://www.gavaghan.org/blog/free-source-code/geodesy-library-vincentys-formula/

EDIT This uses map projections so it does not use straight lines. You need to be aware that the distance between degrees of latitude is more or less constant but the distance between degrees of longitude depends on the latitude.

In addition to the library above there are some simpler approximations for measuring distance between two points and also the coordinates of a point at a given distance and bearing from a start point.

This is some code that measures distance between two points:

double lat1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Latitude.Decimal);
                        double lon1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Longitude.Decimal) * -1;
                        double lat2 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(end.Latitude.Decimal);
                        double lon2 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(end.Longitude.Decimal) * -1;
                        double result = Math.Acos(Math.Sin(lat1) * Math.Sin(lat2) + Math.Cos(lat1) * Math.Cos(lat2) * Math.Cos(lon1 - lon2));
                        distance = FSConvert.DradtoMeters(result);

This is some code to work out Bearing:

if (start == null || end == null)
                        {
                            return 0.0f;
                        }

                        double lat1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Latitude.Decimal);
                        double lon1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Longitude.Decimal) * -1;
                        double lat2 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(end.Latitude.Decimal);
                        double lon2 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(end.Longitude.Decimal) * -1;
                        double y = Math.Atan2(Math.Sin(lon1 - lon2) * Math.Cos(lat2), Math.Cos(lat1) * Math.Sin(lat2) - Math.Sin(lat1) * Math.Cos(lat2) * Math.Cos(lon1 - lon2));
                        const double x = 2 * Math.PI;
                        double result = y - x * Math.Floor(y / x);
                        bearing = FSConvert.RadiansToDegrees(result);

and this is some code to work out the terminal coordinates based on distance and bearing from an origin

double lat1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Latitude.Decimal);
                        double lon1 = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(start.Longitude.Decimal) * -1;
                        double d = FSConvert.MetersToDrad(distance);
                        double tc = FSConvert.DegreesToRadians(bearing);

                        double lat = Math.Asin(Math.Sin(lat1) * Math.Cos(d) + Math.Cos(lat1) * Math.Sin(d) * Math.Cos(tc));
                        double lon = ((lon1 - Math.Asin(Math.Sin(tc) * Math.Sin(d) / Math.Cos(lat)) + Math.PI) % (2 * Math.PI)) - Math.PI;

                        var returnPoint = new FSPoint {
                            Latitude = {
                                Decimal = FSConvert.RadiansToDegrees(lat)
                            },
                            Longitude = {
                                Decimal = FSConvert.RadiansToDegrees(lon) * -1
                            }
                        };
                        point = returnPoint;

The references to FSConvert just change RadiansToDegrees and so on - that is trivial. FSPoint is just a lat/long struct.

So the process is:

  1. Calculate the distance and bearing between your two points
  2. Divide the distance by 10 0r whatever
  3. Calculate the terminal coordinates using the delta distance and bearing.
  4. Keep 'walking the line' til you reach the other end

If you need more help let me know

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The point of my earlier comment is that crows fly along the shortest route between two points, which will be along an orthodrome/great circle (see this for example). This is not a straight line on Google maps, which uses a variant Mercator projection; a straight line on such a map is a loxodrome.

Drawing the latter is trivial, just treat lat and long as plane coordinates. So the point 10% from the origin to the destination, is 10% of the difference in latitude and 10% of the difference in longitude, and so on. This is the whole point of the Mercator projection, it makes navigation from point to point easy, though not navigation along the shortest route.

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In JAVA, you can use this code and it works very well (Conversion from ScruffyDuck's Reply above)

double x2 = next.latitude; 
                double y2 = next.longitude;
                double x1 = current.latitude;
                double y1 = current.longitude;

                double lat1 = Math.toRadians(x1);
                double lon1 = Math.toRadians(y1) * -1;
                double lat2 = Math.toRadians(x2);
                double lon2 = Math.toRadians(y2) * -1;
                double distance = Math.acos(Math.sin(lat1) * Math.sin(lat2) + Math.cos(lat1) * Math.cos(lat2) * Math.cos(lon1 - lon2));

                double var1 = Math.atan2(Math.sin(lon1 - lon2) * Math.cos(lat2), Math.cos(lat1) * Math.sin(lat2) - Math.sin(lat1) * Math.cos(lat2) * Math.cos(lon1 - lon2));
                double var2 = 2 * Math.PI;
                double bearing = var1 - var2 * Math.floor(var1 / var2);

                double lat = Math.asin(Math.sin(lat1) * Math.cos(distance) + Math.cos(lat1) * Math.sin(distance) * Math.cos(bearing));
                double lon = ((lon1 - Math.asin(Math.sin(bearing) * Math.sin(distance) / Math.cos(lat)) + Math.PI) % (2 * Math.PI)) - Math.PI;

                double x = Math.toDegrees(lat);
                double y = Math.toDegrees(lon) * -1;
                //****************

                Location l = new Location("temp");
                l.setLatitude(x);
                l.setLongitude(y); 
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