Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have plans to create an interval app using timers. It should just be the most basic So I'll have to add some more when I've understood the basics. What I want to achieve is to select the number of minutes an interval should last, yet how many times this interval should go. Like a interval that last 1 minute and goes 8 times. The question is which timer is best to use? I have tried me on the Android Countdown Timer and it seems to work. But is there another one which is better?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would always recommend using a Handler.

Its a little more work than the built in classes, but I find that it is vastly more efficient and you have more control over it.

The Handler is a class that will handle code execution over a specific Looper / Thread by default, the Thread it is created in, Otherwise you can specify where the Handler executes its code by passing in the Looper to the Handler constuctor like - new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

The reason I would recommend the looper is because you have a higher flexibility of control over it as its a slightly lower down abstraction over the TimerTask methods.

And generally they are very useful for executing code across threads generally, a method of piping data across threads per ce.

Two mainly used methods are:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    final Handler h = new Handler();
    h.postDelayed(new Runnable()
    {
        private long time = 0;

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            // do stuff then
            // can call h again after work!
            time += 1000;
            Log.d("TimerExample", "Going for... " + time);
            h.postDelayed(this, 1000);
        }
    }, 1000); // 1 second delay (takes millis)
}

Simple use! Or you can use messages, which reduce object creationg if you are thinking about high speed updating UI etc - will reduce GC.

class MainActivity extends Activity {

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        MyTimers timer = new MyTimers();
        timer.sendEmptyMessage(MyTimers.TIMER_1);
        timer.sendEmptyMessage(MyTimers.TIMER_2);

    }


    public static class MyTimers extends Handler
    {

        public static final int TIMER_1 = 0;
        public static final int TIMER_2 = 1;

        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg)
        {
            switch (msg.what)
            {
                case TIMER_1:
                    // Do something etc.
                    Log.d("TimerExample", "Timer 1");
                    sendEmptyMessageDelayed(TIMER_1, 1000);
                    break;
                case TIMER_2:
                    // Do another time update etc..
                    Log.d("TimerExample", "Timer 2");
                    sendEmptyMessageDelayed(TIMER_2, 1000);
                    break;
                default:
                    removeMessages(TIMER_1);
                    removeMessages(TIMER_2);
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

Obs this is not a full implementation but to give you a good way of doing it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank's alot for feedback Chris! I am still a little confused unfortunately. Since Im still in the learning proccess it is some stuff that I need to get. So I looked at your example and also searched about Handler. And I diddn't completely get it, is handler a kind of a thread or is it handling threads ? I feel kind of dumb that I don't understand this hehe, but I felt it is better to ask than just get confused. And do you have a example that is complet? A very very small one. I tried the one above with handler, and it does execute the lines ine the //do stuff.Again Thank's alot for answers:) –  HFherasen Oct 27 '12 at 15:10
    
@user1779228 I have improved the answer with more code (I made a few mistakes, apologies). Handlers are a bit wierd to get you head around at first but they are VERY powerful tool to know/use. If you have ever used the Activity method of runOnUiThread(Runnable) that basically passes your Runnable object to a Handler which is assigned the UI thread to make so it runs there. But as mentioned above you can do timing functions with it, Which make it really useful. –  Chris.Jenkins Oct 27 '12 at 16:35
    
Thank's mate! I kind of understand it now:) So it did help alot. But still the app I want to make just to get more experience is not as easy as I thought hehe. So Im not quiet sure how to make it yet, But Im watching some tutorials and learning more so maybe i will come over a good solution. If you know some good way to get started I wouldn't say no to any help! :D But thank's for the help so far Chris! I will mark your answer as right answer! –  HFherasen Oct 27 '12 at 20:49
    
no problem, well if there complicated questions ask them here, otherwise just tweet me @chrisjenx. Just draw out some user flow and that will indirectly help you architect the app. :) –  Chris.Jenkins Oct 27 '12 at 21:27
1  
I just would like to point out an important note on this method of implementing an interval with a recursive call. If the stuff you are doing is taking a certain amount of time, the intervall frequency will always be greater than the real time frequency. for exemple, you call the method after a second, then you do something (which can take maybe 50ms) and then you recall the method after 1sec. the actual frequency is not 1sec, it becomes 1050ms, and even more confusing can be random depending on the time the app took to execute the stuff you actually want to do. –  Raphael C Sep 18 at 8:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.