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I'm using either dyn or dynlm to predict time series using lagged variables.

However, the predict function in either case only evaluates one time step at a time, taking a constant time of 24 milliseconds per step on my computer, or about 1.8 hours for my dataset, which is super long, given that the entire regression takes about 10 seconds.

So, I'm thinking that perhaps the fastest thing might be just to evaluate the formula by hand?

So, is there some way of evaluating a formula given values in a data.frame or the current envrironment or similar?

I'm thinking of something along the lines of:

evalMagic( load ~ temperature + time, data.frame( temperature = 10, time = 4 ) )

I suppose, as I write this, that we need to handle the coefficients somehow, something like:

evalMagic( load ~ temperature + time, data.frame( temperature = 10, time = 4 ), model$coefficients )

.... so this raises the questions of:

  • isn't this what predict is supposed to do?
  • why is predict so slow?
  • what options do I have to make the prediction a bit faster? After all, it's not inverting any matrices or something, it's just a bit of arithmetic!
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1  
Why don't you look inside predict.dyn and see what the code does? I suspect it's more complicated than you think :-) –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 27 '12 at 13:46
    
It wraps predict apparently. NextMethod("predict") –  Hugh Perkins Oct 27 '12 at 13:58
    
But calling predict directly with some manually lagged data, without using timeseries, is 6 times faster. –  Hugh Perkins Oct 27 '12 at 14:00
2  
What evidence do you have that the slow part of the function call is the formula evaluation? –  joran Oct 27 '12 at 14:05
3  
@bill_080 It generally pays to think this through. We use formula() and predict() etc to get easy and powerful tools for exploration. For repeated and fast estimation and fitting, more bare bones approaches exist. Look eg at RcppGSL, RcppEigen and RcppArmadillo all of which bring a replacement fastLm() function. Dropping formula() alone will reap a large speed benefit. And as we said: Profile!! –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Oct 27 '12 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

I wrote my own lag implementation in the end. It's hacky and not beautiful, but it's a lot faster. It can process 1000 rows in 4 seconds on my crappy laptop.

# lags is a data.frame, eg:
#   var  amount
#   y    1
#   y    2
addLags <- function( dataset, lags ) {
    N <- nrow(dataset)
    print(lags)
    if( nrow(lags) > 0 ) {
        print(lags)
        for( j in 1:nrow(lags) ) {
            sourcename <- as.character( lags[j,"var"] )
            k <- lags[j,"amount"]
            cat("k",k,"sourcename",sourcename,"\n")
            lagcolname <- sprintf("%s_%d",sourcename,k)
            dataset[,lagcolname] <- c(rep(0,k), dataset[1:(N-k),sourcename])
        }
    }
    dataset
}

lmLagged <- function( formula, train, lags ) {
    # get largest lag, and skip that
    N <- nrow(train)
    skip <- 0
    for( j in 1:nrow(lags) ) {
        k <- lags[j,"amount"]
        skip <- max(k,skip)
    }
    print(train)
    train <- addLags( train, lags )
    print(train)
    lm( formula, train[(skip+1):N,] )
}

# pass in training data, test data,
# it will step through one by one
# need to give dependent var name
# lags is a data.frame, eg:
#   var amount
#   y    1
#   y    2
predictLagged <- function( model, train, test, dependentvarname, lags ) {
    Ntrain <- nrow(train)
    Ntest <- nrow(test)
    test[,dependentvarname] <- NA
    testtraindata <- rbind( train, test )
    testtraindata <- addLags( testtraindata, lags )
    for( i in 1:Ntest ) {
       thistestdata <- testtraindata[Ntrain + i,]
       result <- predict(model,newdata=thistestdata)
       for( j in 1:nrow(lags) ) {
            sourcename <- lags[j,"var"]
            k <- lags[j,"amount"]
            lagcolname <- sprintf("%s_%d",sourcename,k)
            testtraindata[Ntrain + i + k,lagcolname] <- result
       }
       testtraindata[Ntrain+i,dependentvarname] <- result
    }
    return( testtraindata[(Ntrain+1):(Ntrain + Ntest),dependentvarname] )    
}

library("RUnit")

# size of training data
N <- 6
predictN <- 50

# create training data, which we can get exact fit on
set.seed(1)
x = sample( 100, N )
traindata <- numeric()
traindata[1] <- 1 + 1.1 * x[1]
traindata[2] <- 2 + 1.1 * x[2]
for( i in 3:N ) {
   traindata[i] <- 0.5 + 0.3 * traindata[i-2] - 0.8 * traindata[i-1] + 1.1 * x[i]
}
train <- data.frame(x = x, y = traindata, foo = 1)
#train$x <- NULL

# create testing data, bunch of NAs
test <- data.frame( x = sample(100,predictN), y = rep(NA,predictN), foo = 1)

# specify which lags we need to handle
# one row per lag, with name of variable we are lagging, and the distance
# we can then use these in the formula, eg y_1, and y_2
# are y lagged by 1 and 2 respectively
# It's hacky but it kind of works...
lags <- data.frame( var = c("y","y"), amount = c(1,2) ) 

# fit a model
model <- lmLagged(  y ~ x + y_1 + y_2, train, lags )
# look at the model, it's a perfect fit. Nice!
print(model)

print(system.time( test <- predictLagged( model, train, test, "y", lags ) ))
#checkEqualsNumeric( 69.10228, test[56-6], tolerance = 0.0001 )
#checkEquals( 2972.159, test$y[106-6] )
print(test)

# nice plot
plot(test, type='l')

Output:

> source("test/test.regressionlagged.r",echo=F)

Call:
lm(formula = formula, data = train[(skip + 1):N, ])

Coefficients:
(Intercept)            x          y_1          y_2  
        0.5          1.1         -0.8          0.3  

   user  system elapsed 
  0.204   0.000   0.204 
 [1]  -19.108620  131.494916  -42.228519   80.331290  -54.433588   86.846257
 [7]  -13.807082   77.199543   12.698241   64.101270   56.428457   72.487616
[13]   -3.161555   99.575529    8.991110   44.079771   28.433517    3.077118
[19]   30.768361   12.008447    2.323751   36.343533   67.822299  -13.154779
[25]   72.070513  -11.602844  115.003429  -79.583596  164.667906 -102.309403
[31]  193.347894 -176.071136  254.361277 -225.010363  349.216673 -299.076448
[37]  400.626160 -371.223862  453.966938 -420.140709  560.802649 -542.284332
[43]  701.568260 -679.439907  839.222404 -773.509895  897.474637 -935.232679
[49] 1022.328534 -991.232631

There's about 12 hours work in those 91 lines of code. Ok, I confess I played Plants and Zombies for a bit. So, 10 hours. Plus lunch and dinner. Still, quite a lot of work anyway.

If we change predictN to 1000, I get about 4.1 seconds from the system.time call.

I think it's faster because:

  • we don't use timeseries; I suspect that speeds things up
  • we don't use dynamic lm libraries, just normal lm; I guess that's slightly faster
  • we only pass a single row of data into predict for each prediction, which I think is significantly faster, eg using dyn$lm or dynmlm, if one has a lag of 30, one would need to pass 31 rows of data into predict AFAIK
  • a lot less data.frame/matrix copying, since we just update the lag values in-place on each iteration

Edit: corrected minor buggette where predictLagged returned a multi-column data-frame instead of just a numeric vector Edit2: corrected less minor bug where you couldn't add more than one variable. Also reconciled the comments and code for lags, and changed the lags structure to "var" and "amount" in place of "name" and "lags". Also, updated the test code to add a second variable.

Edit: there are tons of bugs in this version, which I know, because I've unit-tested it a bit more and fixed them, but copying and pasting is very time-consuming, so I will update this post in a few days, once my deadline is over.

share|improve this answer

Maybe you're looking for this:

fastlinpred <- function(formula, newdata, coefs) {
   X <- model.matrix( formula, data=newdata)
   X %*% coefs
}
coefs <- c(1,2,3) 
dd <- data.frame( temperature = 10, time = 4 )
fastlinpred(  ~ temperature + time, 
      dd , coefs )

This assumes that the formula has only a RHS (you can get rid of the LHS of a formula by doing form[-2]).

This certainly gets rid of a lot of the overhead of predict.lm, but I don't know if it is as fast as you want. model.matrix has a lot of internal machinery too.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I see: predict just ultimately calls %*%, which probably calls a BLAS function, so doing a single predict call is super fast, but iterating over thousands of steps is incredibly slow. –  Hugh Perkins Oct 27 '12 at 17:20
    
This looked like faster, but I couldn't figure out how to parse the formula, and I figure I would make lots of mistakes with the order of the coefficients and stuff if I did it by hand. –  Hugh Perkins Oct 27 '12 at 18:30
1  
@HughPerkins you don't need to parse the formula, model.matrix() will do that for you. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 27 '12 at 21:46
    
Well, I have the following obstacles: 1. how do I know which coefficients to pass where? 2. how do I apply lag? I notice that if I submit a formula with lag(y,1), then it will simply use the y values directly ,without lagging them. Therefore it needs manual intervention, ie I have to write some code to hack the lags in myself. ? –  Hugh Perkins Oct 28 '12 at 0:19
    
Your original question isn't very specific. My answer attempted to give a generic answer for a simple case (without lags etc.) such as you described. The more generic "speed up the way the dyn package works" request is a little harder (maybe too hard for a single SO question). –  Ben Bolker Oct 28 '12 at 13:15

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