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C++ operator % guarantees

In c++ 98/03

5.6-4

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined; otherwise (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a. If both operands are nonnegative then the remainder is nonnegative; if not, the sign of the remainder is implementation-defined.

In c++ 11:

5.6 -4

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined. For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded;81 if the quotient a/b is representable in the type of the result, (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a.

As you can see the implementation-defined for the sign bit is missing, what happens to it ?

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marked as duplicate by Christian Rau, Andrew Marshall, Luc Danton, ildjarn, Graviton Oct 28 '12 at 6:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What are you trying to do? And how this comes as a obstacle for that? –  AnandVeeramani Oct 27 '12 at 13:49
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@AnandVeeramani: some people just want to avoid undefined (or, in this case, implementation-defined) behavior. I'm glad he asked this, I have avoided modulo when the values could have been negative. –  moswald Oct 27 '12 at 14:01
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Also, see: stackoverflow.com/q/3609572/485561 –  Mankarse Oct 27 '12 at 14:03
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C++ 98/03 also had this footnote: "According to work underway toward the revision of ISO C, the preferred algorithm for integer division follows the rules defined in the ISO Fortran standard, ISO/IEC 1539:1991, in which the quotient is always rounded toward zero" C++11 simply made that a requirement of the standard (as C99 did for C). Removing the implementation defined part of the % operator is a consequence of that. –  Michael Burr Oct 27 '12 at 15:21
    
@moswald: you would have to avoid using / operator in those cases as well, since it is similarly implementation defined. –  Michael Burr Oct 27 '12 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The behaviour of % was tightened in C++11, and is now fully specified (apart from division by 0).

The combination of truncation towards zero and the identity (a/b)*b + a%b == a implies that a%b is always positive for positive a and negative for negative a.


The mathematical reason for this is as follows:

Let ÷ be mathematical division, and / be C++ division.

For any a and b, we have a÷b = a/b + f (where f is the fractional part), and from the standard, we also have (a/b)*b + a%b == a.

a/b is known to truncate towards 0, so we know that the fractional part will always be positive if a÷b is positive, and negative is a÷b is negative:

sign(f) == sign(a)*sign(b)

a÷b = a/b + f can be rearranged to give a/b = a÷b - f. a can be expanded as (a÷b)*b:

(a/b)*b + a%b == a => (a÷b - f)*b+a%b == (a÷b)*b.

Now the left hand side can also be expanded:

(a÷b)*b - f*b + a%b == (a÷b)*b

a%b == f*b

Recall from earlier that sign(f)==sign(a)*sign(b), so:

sign(a%b) == sign(f*b) == sign(a)*sign(b)*sign(b) == sign(a)

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@mata: The sign is only determined by a, you have messed up the arithmetic there (-1/2) = -0.5 = 0 (after truncation), so 0 + x = -1, so x = -1. –  Mankarse Oct 27 '12 at 14:26
    
@Mankarse:The equation is always there (as in 03 standard), the only thing new seems to be what's so called 'truncation towards zero'. What this 'truncation towards zero' all about ? –  Gob00st Oct 27 '12 at 14:26
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@Gob00st: Truncation towards zero means that the fractional part of the result of a division is discarded in the result, so 5/4 == 1.25 => 1 (discard 0.25), and -7/4 == -1.75 => -1 (discard -0.75). –  Mankarse Oct 27 '12 at 14:28
    
Yes that's always there isn't it ? What I meant was how's this implies "that a%b is always positive for positive a and negative for negative a." ? Whereas in 03 standard is not. –  Gob00st Oct 27 '12 at 14:31
    
@Gob00st: See my edit, in C++03, we could not be sure that sign(f)==sign(a)*sign(b). –  Mankarse Oct 27 '12 at 14:47

The algorithm says (a/b)*b + a%b = a, which is easier to read if you remember that it's truncate(a/b)*b + a%b = a Using algebra, a%b = a - truncate(a/b)*b. That is to say, f(a,b) = a - truncate(a/b)*b. For what values is f(a,b) < 0?

It doesn't matter if b is negative or positive. It cancels itself out because it appears in the numerator and the denominator. Even if truncate(a/b) = 0 and b is negative, well, it's going to be canceled out when it's a product of 0.

Therefore, it is only the sign of a that determines the sign of f(a,b), or a%b.

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The equation is always there as in 03 standard as well ... –  Gob00st Oct 27 '12 at 14:27
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@Gob00st: The difference is that in C++03, rounding of divisions was not fully specified. –  Mankarse Oct 27 '12 at 14:31

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