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I am trying to implement an XML Schema which will enforce the following the XML ;

<databases>
    <database>
        <name>"Test A"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.100"</host>
        <default>yes</default>
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test B"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.200"</host>
        <default>no</default>        
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test C"</name>
        <host>"localhost"</host>
        <default>no</default>        
    </database>
</databases>

I am able to implement the XML Schema myself except for one crucial issue; and that is that a maximum of only one database should be marked as the default. This means that zero databases could be marked as the default and this should also be considered valid.

As an example, the following XML should be considered invalid by the XML Schema, since more than one database is marked as default.

<databases>
    <database>
        <name>"Test A"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.100"</host>
        <default>yes</default>
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test B"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.200"</host>
        <default>no</default>        
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test C"</name>
        <host>"localhost"</host>
        <default>yes</default>        
    </database>

Whereas the following XML should be considered valid by the XML Schema since no (zero) databases are marked as default ;

<databases>
    <database>
        <name>"Test A"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.100"</host>
        <default>no</default>
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test B"</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.200"</host>
        <default>no</default>        
    </database>
    <database>
        <name>"Test C"</name>
        <host>"localhost"</host>
        <default>no</default>        
    </database>

Does anyone know if it is possible to enforce such a constraint with XML Schemas? I feel as though it should be, but I'm not sure how to go about implementing it.

Any assistance with respect to this matter would be immensely appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest way to check that only one database is marked as the default is probably to structure your XML differently: record the databases as above, but drop the default element, and add an attribute or child element to the databases element which identifies the default database. Your XML becomes:

<databases default="Test A">
    <database>
        <name>Test A</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.100"</host>
   </database>
    <database>
        <name>Test B</name>
        <host>"192.168.0.200"</host>
   </database>
    <database>
        <name>Test C</name>
        <host>"localhost"</host>
   </database>
</databases>

(I have dropped the quotation marks in the name elements, on the theory that they are not actually part of the database name. If they are part of the name, then the default attribute will need to be something like default='"Test A"', including the quotes.)

You will need to ensure that the database/name element is unique; do this with an xs:key construct in the declaration of the databases element. You will also need to ensure that the optional default attribute points at a database name; do this with xs:keyref. The declaration of databases might look something like this:

<xs:element name="databases" type="databases">
  <xs:key name="dbname">
    <xs:selector xpath="database"/>
    <xs:field xpath="name"/>
  </xs:key>
  <xs:keyref refer="dbname" name="defaultdb">
    <xs:selector xpath="."/>
    <xs:field xpath="@default"/>
  </xs:keyref>
</xs:element>

A second approach makes a slightly devious use of xs:unique, but again requires refactoring your XML. Instead of making the third child of database be default with values yes or no, make the third child be either an element named default-database or an element named non-default-database (change the names to suit your preferences, of course). Define these in such a way as to ensure that every instance of default-database has the same simple-type value.

Then specify that no two occurrences of default-database may have the same string value, using xs:unique:

<xs:unique name="dbname">
  <xs:selector xpath="database"/>
  <xs:field xpath="default-database"/>
</xs:unique>

Since every instance of default-database has the same value, this uniqueness constraint ensures that there can only ever be one such element. The schema as a whole might look something like this. First the bookkeeping:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
  elementFormDefault="qualified">

Now the element declaration for databases:

  <xs:element name="databases" type="databases">
    <xs:unique name="dbname">
      <xs:selector xpath="database"/>
      <xs:field xpath="default-database"/>
    </xs:unique>
  </xs:element>

And its complex type:

  <xs:complexType name="databases">
    <xs:sequence minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded">
      <xs:element ref="database"/>
    </xs:sequence>
    <xs:attribute name="default" type="xs:string" use="optional"/>
  </xs:complexType>

Now some more bookkeeping: declaration for database, just to keep us honest.

  <xs:element name="database" type="database"/>

  <xs:complexType name="database">
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element name="name" type="xs:string"/>
      <xs:element name="host" type="xs:string"/>
      <xs:choice>       
        <xs:element name="default-database" type="empty"/>
        <xs:element name="non-default-database" type="empty"/>
      </xs:choice>
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>

And a final bit of bookkeeping: a type that ensures that every instance of default-database has the same value. (There are other ways to achieve this, of course; this is just the one that came to mind first.)

  <xs:simpleType name="empty">
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:enumeration value=""/>
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType> 

</xs:schema>

If you are absolutely married to your existing design, then I don't know how to do what you want to do in XSD 1.0; if you can use XSD 1.1, of course, you can add an assertion on databases that says

<xs:assert test="count(database[default = 'yes']) = 1"/>

But as the alternative solutions above illustrate, that design and the use of assertions is not your only option.

share|improve this answer
    
An absolutely fantastic response. Some great suggestions which have been very well written. Thankyou so very much. – user1094648 Oct 29 '12 at 11:20

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