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I have a workflow for a model in the Django admin that is very similar to the users' workflow. First, I have a form with basic fields and then, a second form with the rest of the data.

It's the same workflow as auth.user

I need to remove "save and continue" and "save and add another" buttons to prevent the user breakoing the workflow.

I have tried to add it as extra_context

extra_context = {
  'show_save_and_add_another': False,
  'show_save_and_continue': False
}

and pass it through ModelAdmin.add_view or ModelAdmin.change_view but it doesn't work.

This is only for one model, so I don't want to remove from submit_line.html

Any clue or alternative way?

Thanks in advance

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Beside its (a bit awkward) hacking style, you could aslo override the template tag directly. Normally overriding template is more recommended.

# put this in some app such as customize/templatetags/admin_modify.py and place the app
# before the 'django.contrib.admin' in the INSTALLED_APPS in settings

from django.contrib.admin.templatetags.admin_modify import *
from django.contrib.admin.templatetags.admin_modify import submit_row as original_submit_row
# or 
# original_submit_row = submit_row

@register.inclusion_tag('admin/submit_line.html', takes_context=True)
def submit_row(context):
    ctx = original_submit_row(context)
    ctx.update({
        'show_save_and_add_another': context.get('show_save_and_add_another', ctx['show_save_and_add_another']),
        'show_save_and_continue': context.get('show_save_and_continue', ctx['show_save_and_continue'])
        })                                                                  
    return ctx 
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2  
I think this is actually the best approach. First, I tried to do what you explain in # put this in some app such as customize/templatetags/admin_modify.py ... but it didn't work. Then, I put this piece of code at the beginning of the admin.py file and it works perfect. –  Manuel Alvarez Oct 29 '12 at 10:21
1  
@ManuelAlvarez fine. Perhaps your customize/templatetags/ lacked __init__.py and was thus not a package and got ignored. I'm not quite sure whether your admin.py solution works in all circumstances, we'll see :) –  okm Oct 29 '12 at 11:09
1  
what's the purpose of that import * ? I tried to delete it, and import all those functions one by one, but my custom submit_row method is not called anymore. Any ideeas why ? –  NiCU Oct 10 '13 at 7:51
1  
@NiCU It's a quick typing to import all requisites. Importing one by one is more appropriate. Perhaps your tag does not override the original one, because your custom app places after the original app in INSTALLED_APPS? –  okm Oct 11 '13 at 5:25
    
yeah, i had some issues there now it's fixed (umm... i guess i should delete my comments since are not really useful) –  NiCU Oct 11 '13 at 7:53

This isn't possible with an 'out of the box' option as far as I can tell, but this is how I'd go about doing what you want to do.

The bit of code we care about is this templatetag - this seems to override show_save_and_add_another and show_save_and_continue regardless of what you have set it to. It also creates a whole new context and copies only certain values across (not clear what the justification for this is), so you'll have to modify it to get what you need.

So:

  1. Create a templatetag that replicates the functionality of the default tag, either by reusing the existing one (see okm's example) or by duplicating it entirely. The only change here is that it should either keep your show_save_and_add_another from the original context without overwriting it, or pass through your own really_hide_save_and_add_another_damnit context variable.
  2. Replace change_form.html to include and use your own templatetag, replacing submit_row with it.
  3. Update change_form.html if you've gone for the option of using an extra context variable, wrapping the buttons with another conditional statement.

Then, regardless of what option you went for, update your ModelAdmin with something like (based on this from the Django docs):

class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    # ...
    def change_view(self, request, object_id, form_url='', extra_context=None):
        extra_context = extra_context or {}
        extra_context['show_save_and_add_another'] = False
        # or
        extra_context['really_hide_save_and_add_another_damnit'] = True
        return super(MyModelAdmin, self).change_view(request, object_id,
            form_url, extra_context=extra_context)

Updated: Original response didn't take in to account the submit_row not passing along any the whole original context.

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It works well and I can test my 'really_hide_save_and_add_another_damnit' new var on change_form.html but it seems that I can't do it in submit_line.html since its value is '' in all cases. I've tried to test, check, print,... the value without success. Do I need to load any aditional library at the beginning of the template? –  Manuel Alvarez Oct 28 '12 at 7:50
    
Sorry I didn't realise the submit_row templatetag doesn't copy the whole context across - only certain items. You'll need to override this templatetag, either entirely, or using okm's option. –  Tom Oct 28 '12 at 9:41

You can also use CSS and it might not be the best approach but its probably the most simple and still granular enough to only hide them on certain model admins. In my case its just for cosmetic purposes:

admin.py:

class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin)

    ....

    class Media:
        #js = ('' )  # Can include js if needed
        css = {'all': ('my_admin/css/my_model.css', )}  

my_model.css is located in the static files folder in the path above.

my_model.css:

/* Hide the "Add Another" and "Save" buttons */
input[name="_addanother"], input[name="_save"]{
    display: none;
}

/* Optionally make the continue and save button look like primary */
input[name="_continue"]{
    border: 2px solid #5b80b2;
    background: #7CA0C7;
    color: white;
}

/* Optionally you can change the CSS of the "Delete" button, .deletelink as the css selector */

The classes and names may change between django versions for these buttons, I am using Django 1.6.6. I am pretty sure they haven't changed for a while though. If you want this to be effective on your entire admin site, you can copy admin/base_site.html default template into your static dir and overwrite extrahead block to include this style. See base_site.html.

This is just another way that it can be done through the CSS approach. Hope it helps :)

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