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I'm trying to make the main function short. I need to answer some questions ( many lines of code each, inside every questions, I need to use variables declared in main) But using functions, the way I Know how to use then, won't be useful, 'cause I need to use inside every question lots of variables, different types, and not arrays. Sorry for my english, It's hard to explain what I need.

this is my code mixed with pseudocode (simplified)

int
main(void)
{
    int x = 4;
    int y = 5;
    float z = 6.8; // And lot of more variables like this

    answer_1;  //pseudocode
    answer_2:  

    return 0;
}

// inside answer1 there are lots of printf's showing the value of variable x, y, z.... etc)

// inside answer1 there are lots of printf's showing the value of variable t, i, l.... etc)

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closed as not a real question by H2CO3, WhozCraig, Blue Moon, Evgeny Kluev, Graviton Nov 26 '12 at 3:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
"I need inside a function to use a variable declared in Main." - wait, isn't that exactly what function arguments are for? –  user529758 Oct 27 '12 at 15:48
    
What is shortened main? –  pmod Oct 27 '12 at 15:49
1  
bring that or those variables outside the body of main as static int x = 4;. At least that way their visibility is limited to the current compilation unit (file) as opposed to a global var that becomes visible all over the project. However, even with static vars a slightly more telling varname than x would probably be a good idea. –  fvu Oct 27 '12 at 15:49
5  
Consider using structs and/or arrays to reduce the number of arguments to be passed. –  DrummerB Oct 27 '12 at 15:50
1  
@jotape Just use fubctions and pass arguments. If you have variables which are like global options (such as parsed command line args), then making those global variables is quite ok practice. –  hyde Oct 27 '12 at 18:13

3 Answers 3

With the code sample you've posted, the best way to pass in x is as an argument to the function.

void func(int x);

int main(void)
{
    int x = 4;
    func(x);
    return 0;
}

void func(int x)
{
    printf("X = %d", x);
}

If this won't work in your real code, could you post a longer example?

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Ok, but what if a have 20 variables to pass, different types, not arrays. What I'm trying to do is calling a function (in my example) for every answer in a list of requirements. Is just to make more readable my code to my teacher. –  jotape Oct 27 '12 at 16:00
2  
If you've got a lot of state that you want to pass around to different functions, I'd recommend grouping the values logically into structs, or pointers to structs. Are there logical groups between the variables? eg, fooA, fooB, fooC, could all be stored in one struct foo, with members a, b, c. –  Douglas Oct 27 '12 at 16:04
1  
Also, if you have 20 parameters, then you perhaps need to break things up into multiple functions. The struct approach to encapsulating a comprehensive state is also advisable, as noted above. –  Joe Oct 27 '12 at 16:24
2  
@Douglas may be a Struct is what I'm looking for. I'll dive in Structs. –  jotape Oct 27 '12 at 16:30

If you don't want to pass these variables to the function, you can either

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2  
To the OP: don't do this. Nobody writes C this way, for good reason. Use parameter passing the way it's intended. –  Joe Oct 27 '12 at 15:59
1  
Might be worth pointing out, that global variables (both static and exported) are generally a bad practice, and something totally horrendous if they are used to replace function parameters. It's like using a singleton in an OOP language to pass method parameters... –  hyde Oct 27 '12 at 16:01
    
@Joe I'm learning; perhaps using a function in my example is not what I need. I'll change the question so it can be understand the way I intended –  jotape Oct 27 '12 at 16:04
    
One notable exception: it is quite normal to make truly shared stuff into global (or static) variables, like options parsed from command line arguments. Basically anything which would make sense to be singleton in OOP language is good candidate for global variable. –  hyde Oct 27 '12 at 18:16

Try using "function within another function"

function main will contain other two functions. define variables first and then write function body.

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