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I'm quite stuck with this problem for sometime now..

How do I sort column A depending on the contents of Column B?

I have this sample:

ID  count   columnA     ColumnB
-----------------------------------
12  1      A         B
13  2      C         D
14  3      B         C

I want to sort it like this:

ID  count   ColumnA     ColumnB
-----------------------------------
12  1   A       B
14  3   B       C
13  2   C       D

so I need to sort the rows if the previous row of ColumnB = the next row of ColumnA

I'm thinking a loop? but can't quite imagine how it will work...

I was thinking it will go like this (maybe)

SELECT 
    a.ID, a.ColumnA, a.ColumnB
FROM 
    TableA WITH a (NOLOCK)
LEFT JOIN 
    TableA b WITH (NOLOCK) ON a.ID = b.ID AND a.counts = b.counts
WHERE
    a.columnB = b.ColumnA

the above code isn't working though and I was thinking more on the lines of...

DECLARE @counts int = 1
DECLARE @done int = 0

--WHILE @done = 0
BEGIN

SELECT 
    a.ID, a.ColumnA, a.ColumnB
FROM 
    TableA WITH a (NOLOCK)  
LEFT JOIN 
    TableA b WITH (NOLOCK)  ON a.ID = b.ID AND a.counts = @counts
WHERE 
    a.columnB = b.ColumnA

set @count = @count +1
END

If this was a C code, would be easier for me but T-SQL's syntax is making it a bit harder for a noobie like me.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Edit: sample code

drop table tablea
create table TableA(
id int,
colA varchar(10),
colb varchar(10),
counts int
)

insert INTO TableA
(id, cola, colb, counts)
select 12, 'Bad', 'Cat', 3

insert INTO TableA
(id, cola, colb, counts)
select 13, 'Apple', 'Bad', 1

insert INTO TableA
(id, cola, colb, counts)
select 14, 'Cat', 'Dog', 2

select * FROM TableA

SELECT a.ID, a.ColA, a.ColB
FROM TableA a WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT JOIN TableA b WITH (NOLOCK) 
     ON a.ID = b.ID
Where a.colB = b.ColA
ORDER BY a.ColA ASC
share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! When adding code or tabular data, please use 4-space indentation. You can automatically add the indentation by selecting the corresponding text and either clicking the {} button on the toolbar or pressing the Ctrl+K shortcut. Thank you! –  Andriy M Oct 27 '12 at 19:19
    
More help on formatting: Markdown Editing Help. –  Andriy M Oct 27 '12 at 19:23
    
Is this SQL Server? If so, is the version 2005+? –  Andriy M Oct 28 '12 at 13:37

1 Answer 1

you just need to add ORDER BY clause

-- SELECT a.ID, a.ColumnA, a.ColumnB
-- FROM TableA WITH a (NOLOCK) 
--        LEFT JOIN TableA b WITH (NOLOCK) 
--            ON a.ID = b.ID
--               and a.counts = b.counts
-- Where a.columnB = b.ColumnA
ORDER BY a.ColumnA ASC
share|improve this answer
    
But what if the column's for Column A and Column B are actual words? Like: ID counts Column A ColumnB 12 1 HEY YAY 14 3 BAY DAY 13 2 YAY BAY so I want it to be ID counts Column A ColumnB 12 1 HEY YAY 13 2 YAY BAY 14 3 BAY DAY –  Criss Nautilus Oct 27 '12 at 17:05
    
the same. the server sorts it for you. try it :D –  John Woo Oct 27 '12 at 17:07
    
wow you're right! Although 1 more question, I seem to be getting only 2 rows> The last row which is supposed to be contain the last order is missing? D: –  Criss Nautilus Oct 27 '12 at 17:18
    
what do you mean missing? maybe it has something to do with your query. can you atleast include it on your question (the query you used)? :D –  John Woo Oct 27 '12 at 17:21
    
the query was: -- SELECT a.ID, a.ColumnA, a.ColumnB, b.ColumnA, b.ColumnB -- FROM TableA WITH a (NOLOCK) -- LEFT JOIN TableA b WITH (NOLOCK) -- ON a.ID = b.ID -- Where a.columnB = b.ColumnA --ORDER BY a.ColumnA ASC and what I got was kinda like this: ID a.ColumnA a.ColumnB b.ColumnA b.ColumnB 12 A B B C 14 B C C D the C and D on b.columnA and b.ColumnB became a row instead of column? :O –  Criss Nautilus Oct 27 '12 at 17:32

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