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I came across some code that looked like this in a code review the other day.

public void DoSomeTasks()
{
  if (CheckSomeState()==true) return;
    DoTaskOne();
  if (CheckSomeState()==true) return;
    DoTaskTwo();
  if (CheckSomeState()==true) return;
    DoTaskThree();
  if (CheckSomeState()==true) return;
    DoTaskFour(); 
}

As the number of tasks increases the code ends up with an ever higher cyclomatic complexity and it also just doesn't feel right to me.

A solution that I have come up with to resolve this is.

private void DoTasksWhile(Func<bool> condition, Action[] tasks)
{
   foreach (var task in tasks)
   {
      if (condition.Invoke()==false) break;
        task.Invoke();
   }
}

Used like this

public void DoSomeTasks()
{
 var tasks = new Action[] { 
  {()=DoTaskOne()},
  {()=DoTaskTwo()},
  {()=DoTaskThree()},
  {()=DoTaskFour()}

  }

  DoTasksWhile(()=>CheckSomeState(), tasks);
}

Anyone got any suggestions to make the code more readable?

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3  
Solve what problem? You seem to have a DRY solution in place already. What exactly is the readability issue? –  Oded Oct 27 '12 at 17:25
3  
You are constantly do comparison of boolean values with true/false. Just use your boolean value in if statement condition. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 27 '12 at 17:28
1  
Oh wow that indentation pattern is extremely confusing... –  Ed S. Oct 27 '12 at 17:32
1  
This belongs on Code Review. –  Kendall Frey Oct 27 '12 at 17:34
    
@Oded, thanks as I posted I realized the fact that the original code isn't DRY was what was bugging me. I was thinking there may be a way to implement this in a more fluent way. e.g. While(someCondition).Do(firstTask()).ThenDo(secondTask).ThenDo(thirdTask).Go(0); –  Andrew Oct 27 '12 at 17:37
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I made a little refactoring of your implementation

private void DoTasksWhile(Func<bool> predicate, IEnumerable<Action> tasks)
{
    foreach (var task in tasks)
    {
        if (!predicate())
            return;
        task();
    }
}
  • you don't need to Invoke delegates. Just execute them
  • do not compare boolean values with true/false (it's useless and you can assign boolean value by mistake)
  • thus you only enumerating tasks, IEnumerable is good for parameter

Also you can create extension method

public static void DoWhile(this IEnumerable<Action> actions,Func<bool> predicate)
{
    foreach (var action in actions)
    {
        if (!predicate())
            return;
        actions();
    }
}

Usage will be very simple:

tasks.DoWhile(() => CheckSomeState());
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, the ==true was more to describe make it clear that the code was returning a boolean, but then again the if statement implies that anyway. Dropping the Invoke() make the code even neater. –  Andrew Oct 27 '12 at 17:41
1  
@Andrew consider to rename CheckSomeState method to something showing it returns boolean value, e.g. IsSomeState –  Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 27 '12 at 17:46
    
@Andrew: Only expressions which evaluate to a boolean can appear inside an if statement, so no need to make that clear. As for accidentally assigning instead of comparing... not likely. The compiler will warn you about assignments within a conditional expression. –  Ed S. Oct 27 '12 at 18:54
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If your orchestration code is going to be very complex, look into using a framework such as WF (workflow foundation).

Otherwise, your code is fine, but I wouldn't change the initial one as it is more readable. It is also more flexible as in the future you may modify those IFs, i.e. the conditions might not remain identical.

I don't see how the cyclomatic complexity is lowered or can be lowered.

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Your solution is perfectly adequate as it stands (although may be overkill in the case of just four steps), but whether it is the best approach in this case depends on what the purpose of CheckSomeState actually is in the context of your program:

  • Is it important that CheckSomeState is called exactly once between every Task?
  • Might it sometimes also need to be called midway through a task?

So for example, if CheckSomeState is actually checking a cancellation flag, then it might need additional checks while inside a long-running task.

Another option available to you is throwing exceptions (e.g. an OperationCancelledException). This keeps your cyclomatic complexity very low as you can now simply do:

CheckForCancel();
DoTaskOne();
CheckForCancel();
DoTaskTwo();

(the downside is that some would consider this to be using exceptions for control flow which is generally frowned upon).

I should also add that the goal should not be to reduce cyclomatic complexity, but to have code that is easy to understand and maintain. Cyclomatic complexity is a useful metric but it sometimes unnecessarily penalises code that is quite straightforward.

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