Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <array>
using namespace std;

constexpr int N = 10;
constexpr int f(int x) { return x*2; }

typedef array<int, N> A;

template<int... i> struct F { constexpr A f() { return A{{ f(i)... }}; } };

template<class X, class Y> struct C;
template<int... i, int... j>
struct C<F<i...>, F<j...>> : F<i..., (sizeof...(i)+j)...> {};

template<int n> struct S : C<S<n/2>, S<n-n/2>> {}; // <--- HERE
template<> struct S<1> : F<0> {};

constexpr auto X = S<N>::f();

int main()
{
        cout << X[3] << endl;
}

I'm getting:

test.cpp:15:24: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct C<S<5>, S<5> >’

I suspect this is because the definition of S is using itself as a base class. (Correct?)

What is the best way to fix this?

Update:

Here is the fixed version:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
using namespace std;

constexpr int N = 10;
constexpr int f(int x) { return x*2; }

typedef array<int, N> A;

template<int... i> struct F { static constexpr A f() { return A{{ ::f(i)... }}; } };

template<class A, class B> struct C {};
template<int... i, int... j> struct C<F<i...>, F<j...>> : F<i..., (sizeof...(i)+j)...>
{
        using T = F<i..., (sizeof...(i)+j)...>;
};

template<int n> struct S : C<typename S<n/2>::T, typename S<n-n/2>::T> {};
template<> struct S<1> : F<0> { using T = F<0>; };

constexpr auto X = S<N>::f();

int main()
{
        cout << X[3] << endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/13072359/… –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 18:36
    
doesnt compile. even c++11 does not allow ellipsis in so lot of places. –  Öö Tiib Oct 27 '12 at 18:40
    
@ÖöTiib: I know it doesn't compile, I'm showing the compiler error. It isn't related to the ellipses. –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 18:42
    
Changes introduced by @Andrew in updated version: (1) struct C's primary template, rather then being declared, is now defined(with an empty definition). (2) struct C's partial specialization now has a non-empty definition containing a template alias for inherited struct F. (3a) For inheriting structure S, struct C's template arguments S now have a scope operator accessing template alias T. (3b) typename for scope operator. (4) Fully specialized struct S, S<1>, once empty definition, contains a template alias using T=F<0>; for S<1>'s inherited F<0> –  damienh Oct 27 '12 at 21:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Define C instead of just declaring it.

template<class X, class Y> struct C {};

In the place you use it the partial specialization does not match and the primary template is instantiated, which is just a declaration.

You may wonder why that specialization is not considered: specializations don't consider conversions, but just the static type. That's why they are so treacherously incompatible with inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, well that sucks. Thanks anyway. –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 18:50
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling I meditated over what you are trying to do here but it doesn't make much sense to me. What is that code actually trying to achieve? I can figure out what F and C, do but the purpose of S eludes me. –  pmr Oct 27 '12 at 19:04
    
See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13072359/… –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 19:07
    
S<N> should give access to F<0,1,2,...,N-1> somehow with log(N) instantiation depth. –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 19:09

Could you just delegate S::f instead of using inheritance?

template<int n> struct S {
    constexpr A f() { return C<S<n/2>, S<n-n/2>>::f(); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
C<S<n/2>, S<n-n/2>> needs to bind to the specialization C<F<i...>,F<j...>>, which it won't because template specialization doesn't consider inheritance. –  Andrew Tomazos Oct 27 '12 at 18:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.