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So I have a header file and 2 .c files within the beginnings of my program. I go to compile and I get the error message (tons of these over and over)

command_parser.c:74:6: error: static declaration of ‘read_args_file’ follows non-static     declaration
command_parser.h:9:6: note: previous declaration of ‘read_args_file’ was here

Now I do not use the static keyword ANYWHERE in my program...so why would GCC go and think that I've declared a static function???

Below is the relevant code for read_args_file's declaration in the .h and .c files:

void read_args_file(char* file_name, char* out_file_name, int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out));

void read_args_file(char* file_name, char* out_file_name, int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out)) {
.....
}

EDIT:

The entire .h file is:

#ifndef COMMAND_PARSER_H_
#define COMMAND_PARSER_H_

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* line 8 follows: */
void switch_parsing(int argc, char* argv[], int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out), char* (*pr    int_usage)()) {
void read_args_file(char* file_name, char* out_file_name, int (*command_read)(char* command,     FILE* ou    t));
void read_args_input(int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out));

#endif

The command_parser.c file until the function definition is:

void switch_parsing(int argc, char* argv[], int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out), char* (*print_usage)()) {

    char* arg;
    char* return_string;
    char* wrong_string = "Please enter either -i, -h, or -f as a switch. Use -h for help.\n";
    char* invalid_f_args = "You entered an invalid number of arguments for the -f switch! Only two are permitted, <commands_file> and <output_file>.\n";
    int str_len = 0;

    char cur;

    if (argc > 1) {
        arg = argv[1];
    }
    else {
        arg = "\0";
    }

    str_len = strlen(arg);
    if (str_len == 2) {
        if (arg[0] == '-') {
            cur = arg[1];
            if (cur == 'i') {
                read_args_input(command_read);
                return_string = "";
            }
            else if (cur == 'f') {
                if (argc == 4) {
                    read_args_file(argv[2], argv[3], (*command_read));
                    return_string = "";
                }
                else {
                    return_string = invalid_f_args;
                }
            }
            else if (cur == 'h') {
                return_string = print_usage();
            }
            else {
                return_string = "The switch ";
                return_string = strcat(return_string, &cur);
                return_string = strcat(return_string, " is an invalid switch.\n");
            }
        }
    }
    else if (str_len == 1) {
        return_string = wrong_string;
    }
    else if (str_len > 2) {
        return_string = wrong_string;
    }
    else if (str_len == 0) {
        return_string = print_usage();
    }
    else {
        return_string = wrong_string;
    }
}

/**
 * Reads arguments from a passed in file name, and writes the output from the commands
 * in the file to the out_file_name. Arguments are run through command_read function
 * passed in to be executed.
 */
/* line 74 follows: */
void read_args_file(char* file_name, char* out_file_name, int (*command_read)(char* command, FILE* out)) {
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closed as too localized by Jens, Eitan T, John Conde, Yogendra Singh, Nikhil Oct 28 '12 at 4:45

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What does the code look like before the declaration and the definition? Do you have a stray definition or hidden macro somewhere? –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 27 '12 at 18:53
    
I invoke the function before the definition in another function. However I include the .h file with the declaration at the top read_args_file(argv[2], argv[3], (*command_read)); Also I should note that I'm a bit new to function pointers, so I may be passing them incorrectly. I had the code above as read_args_file(argv[2], argv[3], command_read); before, and I get the exact same output –  Ethan Oct 27 '12 at 18:57
4  
The error message says that the definition at command_parser.c line 74 is a static definition (as far as the compiler can see). What is on line 74 and the lines immediately preceding it? –  Henning Makholm Oct 27 '12 at 19:00
2  
There is a brace open in the .h file line 8: void switch_parsing(int argc, ..... ){ –  wildplasser Oct 27 '12 at 19:16
1  
What's with the extra spaces in the header file in the lines char* (*pr int_usage) and FILE* ou t? Is that your actual code or a copy+paste error? –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 27 '12 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is a brace open in the .h file line 8: void switch_parsing(int argc, ..... ){

The lines that follow are treated by the compile as one big function body, and the final error will be found after the compiler fails to find a matching '}'. Many lines (and files) later. The OP got lucky: the compiler first found another (semantic) error.

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