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Is it possible to use the std::array<class T, std::size_t N> as a private attribute of a class but initialize its size in the constructor of the class?

class Router{
    std::array<Port,???> ports; //I dont know how much ports do will this have
public:
    Switch(int numberOfPortsOnRouter){
        ports=std::array<Port,numberOfPortsOnRouter> ports; //now I know it has "numberOfPortsOnRouter" ports, but howto tell the "ports" variable?
    }
}

I might use a pointer, but could this be done without it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, the size must be known at compile time. Use std::vector instead.

class Router{
    std::vector<Port> ports;
public:
    Switch(int numberOfPortsOnRouter) : ports(numberOfPortsOnRouter) {
    }
};
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But vector is for data types with "changing" lengths. The size of "ports" on the other hand is constant and can never change. I wonder if I will not loose some performance by using vector. –  Slazer Oct 27 '12 at 19:13
4  
@user: How can you "lose performance" when one way works, and the other does not? Also, you can just choose not to resize the std::vector, giving you no "overhead" except the allocation when a Router object is created. –  Xeo Oct 27 '12 at 19:15
1  
@user1459339: No, vector is for arrays of dynamic size == not known at compile time. –  ybungalobill Oct 27 '12 at 19:17
1  
There is no performance loss, and secondly, you're comparing it to a method that doesn't even work. –  Puppy Oct 27 '12 at 19:18
    
Ok that was stupid question:). Thanks anyway. –  Slazer Oct 27 '12 at 19:19

You have to make your class Router a template class

template<std::size_t N> 
class Router{
    std::array<Port,N> ports; 

...
}

in case you want to be able to specify the size of ports at Router level. By the way, N must be a constant known from compile time.

Otherwise you need std::vector.

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Yes but then I would have to know the number N when passing Router into a function. For example "void foo(Router<???> r);" Anyway, I will use the vector. –  Slazer Oct 27 '12 at 19:34
    
It is convenient to typedef the Router<> class you will use, i.e. typedef Router<20> MyRouter; –  Acorbe Oct 27 '12 at 19:36

The size of an std::array<T, N> is a compile-time constant which can't be changed at run-time. If you want an array with flexible bounds you can use a std::vector<T>. If the size of your array doesn't change and you somehow know the size from its context, you might consider using std::unique_ptr<T[]>. It is a bit more light-weight but also doesn't help with copying or resizing.

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"a bit more light-weight" == saves one word :) EDIT: actually saves nothing if you must store the size separately. –  ybungalobill Oct 27 '12 at 19:21
    
@ybungalobill: You don't have to store the capacity, so it does save one word. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 27 '12 at 19:27
    
@BenjaminLindley: yep, but you are likely to end storing the size twice. Once for your own and once from inside the operator new[] implementation. –  ybungalobill Oct 27 '12 at 19:31
    
@ybungalobill: That additional overhead would apply to vector too, so unique_ptr is still 1 less. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 27 '12 at 19:36
    
@ybungalobill: Often you can infer the size from the context, e.g., when you have another array around. It also saves the capacity. std::vector<T> stores three word s which has a fair chance to be padded to four words. That is you save between 66% and 75% of the size of the control record. Also, when moving the object you need to touch only one word instead of three. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 27 '12 at 19:37

std::array is an array of fixed length. Therefore the length must be known at compile time. If you need an array with dynamic length, you want to use std::vector instead:

class Router{
    std::vector<Port> ports;
public:
    Switch(int numberOfPortsOnRouter):ports(numberOfPortsOnRouter){}
};
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