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I have 3 files. I will give you the exact example:

a.php

<form action="b.php" method="POST">

Enter age:
<input type="text" name="age"><br>
<input type="submit" value="Save">
</form>

b.php

<?php
$age=$_POST["age"];
if (is_numeric($age))
{
    header("Location: c.php");
    exit();
}
else
{
    echo "Age invalid!";
}
?>

c.php

<?php
//i want to use the $age variable here   
echo $age;
?>

How can I use the $age variable from b.php in c.php?

I also tried to session_start(); at file b.php and use $_SESSION["age"]=$_POST["age"]; in b.php and then $_SESSION["age"] in c.php in stead of $age and it still didn't work.

I also tried include but didn't get me anywhere either... maybe I didn't use it correctly.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The issue is that in file b.php, you are not sending the value of age to c.php.

If, in b.php, you did this:

 session_start();
 $_SESSION["age"] = $_POST["age"];

Then, in c.php, you did this:

 session_start();
 $age = $_SESSION["age"];
 echo $age;

It will work properly.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect! i am a noob. i didn't use session_start() in c.php. Thank you! –  Point89 Oct 27 '12 at 20:15
    
@Point89 - great, glad it helped! –  cale_b Oct 27 '12 at 20:16

When the user submits the form at a.php, the browser makes an HTTP POST request to b.php WITH data.

So you have age in $_POST, but your header() in b.php sends user to c.php via HTTP GET request and that's why you can't access $_POST in c.php. This, however, is a good way to prevent refreshing the page causes a data resubmit.

You need to start sessions in c.php as well to access session data, using session_start().

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you must have to add b.php file into c.php , if you don't want to create a session start and destroy.

than after your c.php file must like this

c.php

<?php
include_once 'b.php';
echo $age;
?>
share|improve this answer

If you are going to use the session you have to call session_start() on every page that you want to use $_SESSION vars, plus session_start() has to come before any output. If you use session_start on both pages, you there's no reason that shouldn't work.

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Yes. Thank you! –  Point89 Oct 27 '12 at 20:17

Why not modify b.php into ...

<?php
$age=$_POST["age"];
if (is_numeric($age))
{
    header("Location: c.php?age=$age"); ### so it will be send as get var
    exit();
}
else
{
    echo "Age invalid!";
}
?>

and in c.php

$age = $_GET['age'];

or use session as described by cale_b

share|improve this answer
    
that may be so but it's complicated becose I have to send more variables, not just that one. The other answers are more simple. Thank you anyway! –  Point89 Oct 27 '12 at 20:20
    
in that case: sessions ! ;-) –  max.haredoom Oct 27 '12 at 20:22

Please try this:

b.php:

<?php
   $age=$_POST["age"];
   if (is_numeric($age))
   {
      header("Location: c.php?age=".$age);
      exit();
   }
   else
   {
      echo "Age invalid!";
   }
?>

c.php:

<?php
    //i want to use the $age variable here   
    $age = $_REQUEST["age"];
    echo $age;
?>
share|improve this answer
    
What is the point of having b.php validating the input now? Someone can easily use c.php?age=some-text and it will not be validated against is_numeric(). –  Ayesh K Oct 27 '12 at 20:33

Did you use session_start() in c.php as well? You have to use session_start() in each script that you want to have access to the session. Once you use session_start() in c.php, you should have access to $_SESSION['age'].

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It's not really needed to user header('location: c.php');

It doesn't also look to be a right place to user $_SESSION variables.

I think you could easily include 'c.php' instead of using header('location: c.php');.

b.php

<?php
$age=$_POST["age"];
if (is_numeric($age))
{
    include "c.php"; //THIS LINE HAS BEEN CHANGED
    exit();
}
else
{
    echo "Age invalid!";
}
?>

c.php

<?php
echo $age; //NO CHANGE AT ALL IN THE FILE 'c.php'
?>

So now the browser will stil remain in localhost/project/b.php and your internal action that are being performed in c.php will stay safe.

header('location: c.php'); is used to bring user from one page to another. For example after the user logs in or when his session is expired and he should be authenticated again. In this case the user sees that he is being REDIRECTED to unauthorised pages.

It's not an error to use header() in this case, and the code still works well, but it is not supposed to be for that kind of actions.

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