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The code below works but I am wondering if there is a better way that maybe uses some of the features of coffeescript that I am unfamiliar with.

The problem is this, I need to page items but the paging increases each time.

If I take the number 20 for example, it would create the following pages:

1 - 3 4 - 7 8 - 15 16 - 20

I have the following test and code which does pass:

module 'Remainder',
  setup: ->
    @remainder = 20

test 'splits remainder incrementally', ->
  parts = @remainder.increasingSplit()
  equal parts[0], '1 - 3', ''
  equal parts[1], '4 - 7', ''
  equal parts[2], '8 - 15', ''
  equal parts[3], '16 - 20', ''

Number.prototype.increasingSplit = ->
  start = 1
  nextSplit = 3
  parts = []
  finished = false
  while !finished
    if nextSplit > @
      parts.push "#{start} - #{@}"
      break

    parts.push "#{start} - #{nextSplit}"
    start = nextSplit + 1
    nextSplit = nextSplit * 2 + 1

  parts
share|improve this question
    
You can replace finished = false; while !finished by loop. –  Niko Oct 27 '12 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without changing the algorithm too much, you can try this:

Number::increasingSplit = ->
  start = 1
  nextSplit = 3
  parts = []
  while start <= @
    parts.push "#{start} - #{Math.min nextSplit, @}"
    start = nextSplit + 1
    nextSplit = nextSplit * 2 + 1
  parts

The changes were:

  • replacing .prototype with ::,
  • removing of the finished variable (which was not being used effectively because the break anyway) and the break altogether and changing the condition to start <= @,
  • using only one parts.push <part>, with the minimum between nextSplit and @ as the top.

Also, i'd advice against extending the Number prototype in this case. Extending the prototype of primitive types can sometimes cause weird problems, like:

Number::isFour = -> @ is 4
console.log 4.isFour() # -> false

That happens because inside that function @ will be a Number object instead of a primitive number, thus making the === 4 comparison always fail. That would not happen if you define isFour as a standalone function:

isFour = (n) -> n is 4
console.log isFour 4 # -> true

So, i'd prefer this version of incrasingSplit:

increasingSplit = (n) ->
  start = 1
  nextSplit = 3
  parts = []
  while start <= n
    parts.push "#{start} - #{Math.min nextSplit, n}"
    start = nextSplit + 1
    nextSplit = nextSplit * 2 + 1
  parts

Finally, if you don't mind recursion, you can go with a more FP-style algorithm :)

increasingSplit = (n, start = 1, nextSplit = 3) ->
  if start > n
    []
  else
    part = "#{start} - #{Math.min nextSplit, n}"
    rest = increasingSplit n, nextSplit + 1, nextSplit * 2 + 1
    [part, rest...]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer. I am unfamiliar with: [part, rest...] What does the ... mean in the second element? –  dagda1 Oct 28 '12 at 4:44
    
@dagda1 the ... (aka "splats") there make the rest array expand into the resulting array; the whole expression is equivalent to [part].concat(rest). –  epidemian Oct 28 '12 at 4:53

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