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As I'm used to Tcl and fond of its simplicity, I'd like to create and parse configuration files of the form,

block
{
    key1    val1
    key2    val2

    key3
    {
        subkey1 subval1
        subkey2 subval2
    }

    key4
    {
        item1
        item2
        {item3 has spaces in it}
        {item4 {has {bra{ck}ets}} in it}
    }
}

The PHP array I'd expect for the above example is:

[0] => "block",
[1] => (
    [0] => "key1",
    [1] => "val1",
    [2] => "key2",
    [3] => "val2",
    [4] => "key3",
    [5] => (
        [0] => "subkey1",
        [1] => "subval1",
        [2] => "subkey2",
        [3] => "subval2"
    ),
    [6] => "key4",
    [7] => (
        [0] => "item1",
        [1] => "item2",
        [2] => "item3 has spaces in it"
        [3] => (
            [0] => "item4",
            [1] => (
                [0] => "has",
                [1] => "bra{ck}ets"
            ),
            [2] => "in",
            [3] => "it"
    ),
)

It's up to the program to know to read the contents of block and key3 as key-value pairs, key4 as an array of items (collapsing nested brackets), and so on.

I don't absolutely have to use curly brackets ({})—for example, although I don't know anything about Lisp, it seems to use parentheses (()) (and looks like it influenced Tcl—I'm sure I'm missing a lot of relevant history here...), which is fine.

I think the above example is consistent, but I'm not sure. I think the rule is, "If there is no whitespace (besides leading and trailing) then treat as single, literal entity; otherwise, treat as array."

  1. Is there an official term for this kind of data where everything is a list?

  2. Before I go off writing a PHP function to do this, does anyone know an existing function or some clever method of doing the above conversion?

UPDATE:

@glennjackman points out that my example is inconsistent, which it is. The third entity under key4 should be:

        [2] => (
            [0] => "item3",
            [1] => "has",
            [2] => "spaces",
            [3] => "in",
            [4] => "it",
        ),

Unfortunately however, this is not what I imagined as being the output. After further thought, I think in order to get what I desire, it's necessary to introduce an alternately distinguishable way of indicating literals, e.g. using double quotes "", or using the lack of whitespace following a { as a rule to interpret as a literal.

For now, I will go with the latter, until I think of a more elegant solution. That is, if an open brace { is followed immediately by a non-whitespace character, then consider all of the contents of the open brace, a literal string.

share|improve this question
    
Why the Lisp tag? I don't see what this has to do with Lisp. –  finnw Oct 27 '12 at 22:58
    
@finnw - I'm not positive but I think Lisp has the same kind of everything-is-a-list perspective, and I think it might be a predecessor to Tcl, perhaps a more generic one, so I thought if there existed some implementation that already does this kind of conversion, it might have more to do with Lisp than Tcl. I could definitely be wrong! –  Andrew Cheong Oct 27 '12 at 23:07
    
It's a hard translation to do because of the inherent ambiguities (Tcl uses a type model based on the use of the values, not the declarations of them). Can you do the conversion according to some expected type schema? (e.g., “I'm expecting a map containing a map containing a map”). It wouldn't let you capture exactly what you're after, but virtually all Tcl code is written with such an assumption (or with the types of map values assumed by the map key names, which is more like a C struct I suppose). –  Donal Fellows Oct 28 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

Here is a solution ... am sure it can be improved upon .. your format gave me quite headache but i was able to crack it after a while

Code Used

$string = 'block
    {
        key1    val1
        key2    val2

        key3
        {
            subkey1 subval1
            subkey2 subval2
        }

        key4
        {
            item1
            item2
            {item3 has spaces in it}
            {item4 {has {bra{ck}ets}} in it}
        }

        key5
        {
            This  
            {
                is
                {
                    just
                    {Too Crazy {format}}
                }
            }

        }

    }';

Format Before Your Edit

echo "<pre>";
print_r(parseTCL($string));

Output

Array
(
    [block] => Array
        (
            [0] => key1
            [1] => val1
            [2] => key2
            [3] => val2
            [key3] => Array
                (
                    [0] => subkey1
                    [1] => subval1
                    [2] => subkey2
                    [3] => subval2
                )

            [key4] => Array
                (
                    [0] => item1
                    [1] => item2
                    [2] => item3 has spaces in it <--- Item 3 not broken
                    [item4] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => has
                            [1] => bra{ck}ets 
                        )

                    [3] => in
                    [4] => it
                )

            [key5] => Array
                (
                    [This] => Array
                        (
                            [is] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => just
                                    [1] => Too
                                    [Crazy] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => format
                                        )

                                )

                        )

                )

        )

)

Format After your edit

echo "<pre>";
print_r(parseTCL($string,true));
                           ^----------- Additional Option included 

Output

 .....

            [key4] => Array
                (
                    [0] => item1
                    [1] => item2
                    [2] => item3  <---------- Item 3 has been broken
                    [3] => has
                    [4] => spaces
                    [5] => in
                    [item4] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => has
                            [1] => bra{ck}ets
                        )

                    [6] => in
                    [7] => it
                )



 .....

Function Used

function parseTCL($string, $breakCurly = false) {
    $dataArray = $paths = $toks = $final = array();
    $path = $last = "";

    /**
     * Prepare Tokens
     */
    $array = array_map("trim", explode("\n", $string));
    foreach ( new ArrayIterator($array) as $value ) {
        if (strpos($value, " {") !== false) {
            $v = trim($value, " {}");
            $v = str_replace(array(" {","} "), array(" \n{","\n}\n"), $v);
            $v = explode("\n", $v);
            foreach ( $v as $n ) {
                if (strpos($n, "{") !== false && strpos($n, "}") !== false) {
                    $toks[] = $n;
                    continue;
                } else if (strpos($n, "{") !== false) {
                    $toks[] = "{";
                    $toks[] = trim($n, "{");
                } else if (strpos($n, "}") !== false) {
                    $toks[] = "}";
                    $toks[] = trim($n, "}");
                } else {
                    if (strpos($n, " ") !== FALSE) {
                        $v = explode(" ", $n);
                        foreach ( $v as $n ) {
                            $toks[] = $n;
                        }
                    } else {
                        $toks[] = $n;
                    }
                }
            }
            continue;
        }


        if (strpos($value, " ") !== FALSE && (strpos($value, "{") !== 0 || $breakCurly == true)) {
            $breakCurly === true AND $value = trim($value,"{}");
            $v = explode(" ", $value);
            foreach ( $v as $n ) {
                $toks[] = $n;
            }
            continue;
        }
        $toks[] = $value;
    }


    unset($array);

    /**
     * Convert Tokens to Paths
     */
    foreach ( new ArrayIterator($toks) as $tok ) {
        $tok = trim($tok);
        if (empty($tok))
            continue;
        if ($tok == "{") {
            $path .= $last . "/";
            continue;
        }
        if ($tok == "}") {
            $path = substr($path, 0, strrpos(trim($path, "/"), "/")) . "/";
            continue;
        }
        $tok = trim($tok, "{}");
        $paths[] = $path . $tok;
        $last = $tok;
    }

    /**
     * Convert PATH To array
     */
    $cit = new CachingIterator(new ArrayIterator($paths));
    foreach ( $cit as $path ) {
        if (empty($path))
            continue;
        if ($cit->hasNext()) {
            $in = $cit->getInnerIterator()->current();
            if (strpos($in, $path) === 0)
                continue;
        }
        $parts = array_filter(explode("/", $path));
        $value = array_pop($parts);

        $temp = &$dataArray;
        foreach ( $parts as $key ) {
            $temp = &$temp[$key];
        }
        $temp[] = $value;
    }
    unset($paths);
    return $dataArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much for the thorough input, and wow, in both versions of my edit! Checking the input, output, and code right now... –  Andrew Cheong Oct 28 '12 at 5:17
    
I found a discrepancy, which may be partially my fault, where your code creates key-value pairs when a string is followed by a block. (Note how, for example, in my example key3 and key4 are values, not keys.) (The "my fault" part is that in my example, I made block a key, which it should not have been!) I had been working on a solution in parallel which I'll post shortly, but your contribution is still very much appreciated! –  Andrew Cheong Oct 28 '12 at 6:03

not an answer, but I want more formatting than a comment can give

This is a hard problem. When you see

    item2
    {item3 has spaces in it}

How do you decide to produce

    [1] => "item2",
    [2] => "item3 has spaces in it"

instead of

    [1] => "item2",
    [2] => (
            [0] => "item3",
            [1] => "has"
            [2] => "spaces"
            [3] => "in"
            [4] => "it"
        ),

??

Are you relying on the structure of the document to determine if a list is really a list or just a string? Is it the presence of newlines, or that there are only 2 words on a line, etc?

share|improve this answer
    
Funny, I've been scratching my head the past half an hour trying to resolve that. My example was inconsistent. Your latter production is what the consistent result would be. However, that's not what I want. For what I want, I think it's unavoidable that a second delimiter, e.g. "", must be introduced in order to distinguish lists from strings. Either that, or saying something like, if there is no leading whitespace after the {, e.g. {item3 as opposed to { item3, then treat as a literal string. I can't decide which approach is less ugly. :( Any thoughts or recommendations? –  Andrew Cheong Oct 28 '12 at 2:03
    
I'm going with the latter for now. (See updated question.) Thanks, Glenn! –  Andrew Cheong Oct 28 '12 at 2:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It took a while, but I came up with a solution (without using regular expressions).

Solution

function list_to_array(&$str, $detect_literals = false)
{
    $arr = array();
    while ($str = ltrim($str))
    {
        if ($str[0] === '{')
        {
            if (!$detect_literals || ctype_space($str[1]))
            {
                $str = substr($str, 1);
                $arr[] = list_to_array($str, $detect_literals);
            }
            else
            {
                $pos = -1;
                do $pos = strpos($str, '}', $pos+1);
                while ($pos && !ctype_space($str[$pos+1]));
                if (!$pos) $pos = strlen($str);
                while ($str[$pos-1] === '}') $pos--;
                $arr[] = substr($str, 1, $pos-1);
                $str = substr($str, $pos+1);
            }
        }
        elseif ($str[0] === '}' && ctype_space(substr(ltrim($str, '}'), 0, 1)))
        {
            $str = substr($str, 1);
            return $arr;
        }
        else
        {
            $pos = strlen(strtok($str, " \t\n\r\0\x0B"));
            while ($str[$pos-1] === '}') $pos--;
            $arr[] = substr($str, 0, $pos);
            $str = substr($str, $pos);
        }
    }

    return $arr;
}

where detect_literals by default is false and expands all {...} as arrays, as opposed to being true and expanding only { ...} (note the whitespace) as arrays and otherwise as literals.

Simple Test (input)

Here's the input string from the original question:

$str = '
    block
    {
        key1    val1
        key2    val2

        key3
        {
            subkey1 subval1
            subkey2 subval2
        }

        key4
        {
            item1
            item2
            {item3 has spaces in it}
            {item4 {has {bra{ck}ets}} in it}
        }
    }
';

Simple Test (output, default) — looks as expected

Array
(
    [0] => block
    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => key1
            [1] => val1
            [2] => key2
            [3] => val2
            [4] => key3
            [5] => Array
                (
                    [0] => subkey1
                    [1] => subval1
                    [2] => subkey2
                    [3] => subval2
                )

            [6] => key4
            [7] => Array
                (
                    [0] => item1
                    [1] => item2
                    [2] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => item3
                            [1] => has
                            [2] => spaces
                            [3] => in
                            [4] => it
                        )

                    [3] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => item4
                            [1] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => has
                                    [1] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => bra{ck}ets
                                        )

                                )

                            [2] => in
                            [3] => it
                        )

                )

        )

)

Simple Test (output, detect literals) — looks as expected

Array
(
    [0] => block
    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => key1
            [1] => val1
            [2] => key2
            [3] => val2
            [4] => key3
            [5] => Array
                (
                    [0] => subkey1
                    [1] => subval1
                    [2] => subkey2
                    [3] => subval2
                )

            [6] => key4
            [7] => Array
                (
                    [0] => item1
                    [1] => item2
                    [2] => item3 has spaces in it
                    [3] => item4 {has {bra{ck}ets
                )

            [8] => in
            [9] => it
        )

)

Note that [3] => item4 {has {bra{ck}ets is correct, since the rule for detecting literals is: everything between (1) an open-brace followed by a non-whitespace character and (2) the first close-brace followed by a whitespace character, i.e. the open-braces within a literal are ignored.

Complex Test (input)

To test for robustness I tried the following string as well:

$str = '
    a
    {
    }
    {}
    {}{}
    {
        b
        {
        }
    }
    {
        {}
        c
    }
    {
        { {{ {d}} }}
    }
    {
        e{f
        g}h
        ij{
        }kl
        mn}
    {
        {op}}
    {qrs
';

Complex Test (output, default) — looks as expected

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [1] => Array
        (
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => }{
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [0] => b
            [1] => Array
                (
                )

        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                )

            [1] => c
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => d
                                        )

                                )

                        )

                )

        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [0] => e{f
            [1] => g}h
            [2] => ij{
            [3] => }kl
            [4] => mn
        )

    [8] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [0] => op
                )

        )

    [9] => Array
        (
            [0] => qrs
        )

)

Complex Test (output, detect literals) — looks as expected

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [1] => Array
        (
        )

    [2] => 
    [3] => }{
    [4] => Array
        (
            [0] => b
            [1] => Array
                (
                )

        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [0] => 
            [1] => c
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [0] => { {d
                )

        )

)

Note that [0] => { {d is correct, since the literal is closed as soon as a } followed by whitespace is found. As a consequence, the following }s are processed as ends of arrays, resulting in early termination, and leaving a portion of the input string unprocessed:

        }
        {
            e{f
            g}h
            ij{
            }kl
            mn}
        {
            {op}}
        {qrs
share|improve this answer

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