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Superclass:

public class CwDB{
protected LinkedList<Entry> dict = null;

public CwDB(String filename){
        this.dict = new LinkedList<Entry>();
        try{
            FileReader fr = new FileReader(filename);
            BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
            String w = null;
            while((w = br.readLine()) != null ){
                String c = br.readLine();
                this.add(w,c); //adds new Entry to dict
            }
            br.close();
            fr.close();
        }catch(IOException e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
}
public void add(String word, String clue){
    this.dict.add(new Entry(word,clue));
}
...
}

Subclass:

public class InteliCwDB extends CwDB {

public InteliCwDB(String filename){
    super(filename);
}
}

Case 1:

CwDB db = new CwDB("src/cwdb.txt");

Case 2:

InteliCwDB idb = new InteliCwDB("src/cwdb.txt");

The problem is that case 1 works perfectly, but case 2 doesn't at all. Can you tell me what's wrong? (I don't get any error/exception, just the idb's list is empty, when db's list has ober +1k elements...)

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2  
How do you test that idb's list is empty? What happens if you put a print statement in the superclass constructor, is it printed? –  gd1 Oct 28 '12 at 0:02
    
It shouldn't matter for the code as shown, but methods called from constructors (such as add()) should be marked as final to ensure that subclasses don't over-ride them and inadvertently prevent proper initialisation of the superclass. –  DNA Oct 28 '12 at 0:06
    
Can you print the error trace please –  smk Oct 28 '12 at 0:07
    
He's not getting an error trace. –  Daniel.J.Shapiro Oct 28 '12 at 0:10
2  
try to make use of a debugger (use any modern IDE), and trace step through and watch the changes of variables. –  Adrian Shum Oct 28 '12 at 0:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You say that:

  1. There are no exceptions / stack traces.
  2. The dict list in the created InteliCwDB instance is empty.

If the superclass constructor somehow didn't run, you would have an instance with a dict that was null.

If some other exception was thrown and not caught, then you wouldn't have a InteliCwDB to examine.

So on the face of it, this can only mean that the constructor is running, but the file it reads is empty. In other words you have two different "src/cwdb.txt" files ... in different directories.


Other explanations involve questioning your evidence; e.g.

  • You are describing the symptoms inaccurately.
  • The code you are actually running is substantially different to what you are showing us; e.g. there is some other code that is leaping in and emptying the dict after the constructor has created and filled it. (You haven't declared dict to be private ...).
    [ UPDATE - this was the explanation: see the OP's comments. He had overridden add in the subclass, and that's where the bug was. ]
  • The code you are running doesn't match your source code; i.e. you are not rebuilding / redeploying properly.

My advice would be to recheck your processes and your evidence. And if that doesn't help, then run the application using a debugger, set a breakpoint on the constructor, and single step it so that you can work out what is really happening.

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I've created the example based on description in question and it's working pretty well for me: compilr.com/evgeniynaydenov/super/Program.java - just run and see that it's working. Therefore the code example in question seems is incomplete or some details are missed. –  Eugene Naydenov Oct 28 '12 at 0:31

You should add a catch (Exception e) to your try-catch for the purposes of debugging. An exception that isn't an IOException might be causing you problems. So, try like this:

public CwDB(String filename){
    this.dict = new LinkedList<Entry>();
    try{
        FileReader fr = new FileReader(filename);
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
        String w = null;
        while((w = br.readLine()) != null ){
            String c = br.readLine();
            this.add(w,c); //adds new Entry to dict
        }
        br.close();
        fr.close();
    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }catch(Exception e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Given the way he's running the code (which wasn't shown when you posted your answer, of course!), the exception would show up at the top level anyway... –  DNA Oct 28 '12 at 0:23

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