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I'm using Ruby and needed to somehow generate all permutations of the digits in a given number and store them in an array. So for example I have number n = 9431, I need to generate all possible ways you can order those four numbers and store them in an array (The original can be in the array).

So if I input 9431 I need to get an array back with something like:

[9413, 9431, 9143, 9134, 9314, 9341, 4913, 4931, 4193, 4139, 4319, 4391, 1493, 1439, 1943, 1934, 1394, 1349, 3419, 3491, 3149, 3194, 3914, 3941]

Using strings is fine actually.

Clarification: Oh, and the output must be whole numbers in the array, not their individual digits.

share|improve this question
    
Why didn't you want to use strings? – Amit Kumar Gupta Oct 28 '12 at 2:26
    
Do you want repititions in your list? So if your number is 2222 should your array have one element or 4!? – Amit Kumar Gupta Oct 28 '12 at 2:27
    
@AmitKumarGupta, actually it was impractical before, I updated my functions now, and it's fine. – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:27
    
@AmitKumarGupta, No repetitions, so you can't make 4444, it has to use all the digits, just reorder them. Look at casper's answer. – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:28
    
My question was, what if the input number already has repititions? Try Casper's answer with 4444 as the input instead of 9431. Does it give you the answer you'd want? – Amit Kumar Gupta Oct 28 '12 at 2:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is "cheating", because it uses intermediate strings which you didn't want to do, but it works:

9431.to_s.chars.to_a.permutation.map(&:join).map(&:to_i).uniq
=> [9431, 9413, 9341, 9314, 9143, 9134, 4931, 4913, 4391, 4319, 4193, 
    4139, 3941, 3914, 3491, 3419, 3194, 3149, 1943, 1934, 1493, 1439, 
    1394, 1349]
share|improve this answer
    
it's fine, really cool Thank you! – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:25
    
can you change it to not have repetitions, like if i have 9433, it prints 9433 twice instead of just once. – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:48
    
@Link - Yes. Easy :) Just add a call to uniq at the end. See edit. – Casper Oct 28 '12 at 3:48
    
Normally you'd need repeated_permutation to see duplicates which makes uniq unnecessary, but a number could easily have duplicate digits which would lead to duplicates in the output – AJcodez Oct 28 '12 at 9:31
    
@Casper, yep that made it work! Thanks! – Link Oct 28 '12 at 14:22

You can iterate, using division and/or modulus by 10 to get the individual digits as a list.

You can use the list permutation in order to get the different permutations, e.g.:

irb(main):015:0> elts = [9,4,3,1].permutation.to_a
=> [[9, 4, 3, 1], [9, 4, 1, 3], [9, 3, 4, 1], [9, 3, 1, 4], [9, 1, 4, 3], [9, 1, 3, 4], [4, 9, 3, 1], [4, 9, 1, 3], [4, 3, 9, 1], [4, 3, 1, 9], [4, 1, 9, 3], [4, 1, 3, 9], [3, 9, 4, 1], [3, 9, 1, 4], [3, 4, 9, 1], [3, 4, 1, 9], [3, 1, 9, 4], [3, 1, 4, 9], [1, 9, 4, 3], [1, 9, 3, 4], [1, 4, 9, 3], [1, 4, 3, 9], [1, 3, 9, 4], [1, 3, 4, 9]]
irb(main):016:0> elts.each{ |x| puts x.join }
9431
9413
9341
9314
9143
9134
4931
4913
4391
4319
4193
4139
3941
3914
3491
3419
3194
3149
1943
1934
1493
1439
1394
1349
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of this, but I need to actually have the whole numbers, and not their individual digits in the array. – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:18
    
Ok, edited to include the joined lists. – Brian Cain Oct 28 '12 at 2:23
    
awesome! Thank you! – Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:24

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