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I am new programmer. Can you please help me why this C test program isn't working? It's supposed to be a trim function:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAX 1000

void main(){
    char line[MAX];
    int lgh;
    line[0] = '\0';
    while ((lgh = getLine(line, MAX)) != 0){
        printf("%s", line);
        line[0] = '\0';
    }
}

int getLine(char s[], int length){
    char s2[length];
    int i, ii, qttWord = 0, qttWord2 = 0;
    int c; // c = getchir() d = EOF
    int flag = 2;

    s2[0] = '\0';
    /*Reads the input and puts it into s[], then, verifies if the input is just \n,
    * if so, returns 0(i), if not, puts '\n' at the end of the string ind '\0' to close
    */
    for (i = 0; i < length-1 && (c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n'; ++i){
         s[i] = c;
         ++qttWord;
    }
    if (i == 0){
        if (c == '\n')
            return 0;
    } else if (c == '\n'){
        s[i] = c;
        ++qttWord;
        ++i;
        s[i] = '\0';
    }
    fflush(stdin);
    /*Verifies if the string is just ' ' or '\t'
    * if so, returns 0
    */
    for (i = 0; i <= qttWord && flag != 1; ++i){
        if (s[i] == ' ' || s[i] == '\t'){
            flag = 0;
        } else{
            flag = 1;
        }
    }
    if (flag == 0)
        return 0;
    /*
    *The trim function
    */
    for (i = 0; i < qttWord; ++i){
        if (i < qttWord-1){
            if (s[i] == ' ' && s[i+1] != ' '){
                s2[i] = s[i];
                ++qttWord2;
                printf("1%d\n", s2[i]);//test thing
            }
        }
        if (s[i] != ' '){
            s2[i] = s[i];
            ++qttWord2;
            printf("0%d\n", s2[i]);//test thing
        }
    }
    s[0] = '\0';
    s2[qttWord2+1] = '\0';
    printf("Q:%d\n", qttWord2);//test thing
    printf("A:%s\n", s2);//test thing
    for (i = 0; i < qttWord2+1; ++i){
        s[i] = s2[i];
    }
    return 1;
}

As you can see, I created a bunch of printf tests to see why it isn't working, but it's not helping. I can't understand why it isn't working.

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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, mata, lserni, ЯegDwight, C-Pound Guru Oct 28 '12 at 18:04

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1  
Um, what is a "trim function" ? –  Lee Taylor Oct 28 '12 at 2:11
2  
@LeeTaylor, its a function in which all Leading and trailing whitespace is removed. –  Link Oct 28 '12 at 2:16
    
Maybe it's objecting to void main(); that isn't a standard definition for main(). And maybe it's objecting to fflush(stdin); as that is undefined behaviour, too. And it is surprising that there isn't a function doing the trimming. If you're going to mix it with the I/O, then (a) skip leading white space, and (b) don't add the newline since you're going to trim it off. Also, for diagnosting printing (especially to validate no trailing spaces) use printf("<<%s>>\n", line); in the main program. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 2:22
    
And if it's not working, then what is it doing instead? –  Henning Makholm Oct 28 '12 at 2:22
    
Also, you don't have a trim function. You have some code in another function that is labelled as trimming. –  Lee Taylor Oct 28 '12 at 2:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using rather more standard library functions, notably fgets() to read the line, isspace() to identify space characters, and memmove() to copy the data around, produces this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX 1000

static int getLine(char s[], int length);

int main(void)
{
    char line[MAX];
    int lgh;
    /* Stop on EOF or a blank line */
    while ((lgh = getLine(line, MAX)) > 0)
        printf("%d <<%s>>\n", lgh, line);
    return(0);
}

/*
** Get a line of input with leading and trailing white space
** stripped off.  The newline is not included.  If there is no
** newline in the space available, the length 0 is returned.
** If EOF is encountered, EOF is returned.
*/
static int getLine(char s[], int length)
{
    char s2[length];

    s[0] = '\0';
    if (fgets(s2, sizeof(s2), stdin) == 0)
        return EOF;

    size_t len = strlen(s2);
    if (s2[len-1] != '\n')
        return 0;   /* No newline - line too long */

    /* Find first non-white space */
    size_t off = 0;
    while (isspace(s2[off]))
        off++;
    if (off > len)
        return 0;

    /* Chop trailing space */
    while (len-- > 0 && isspace(s2[len]))
        s2[len] = '\0';

    /* Non-blank string is in s2[off]..s2[len], plus trailing '\0' */
    memmove(s, &s2[off], len-off+2);
    return(len - off + 1);  /* Length excluding trailing null */
}

Note the diagnostic output in main() includes the length reported and also a carefully delimited output string followed by a newline. Clearly, you can replace isspace() with code that strictly checks for blank and tab if you prefer. You can write your own analogue of fgets().

Your original code didn't like it when it got EOF after the first line of input (I don't think I tried it on an empty input). Always make sure you handle the degenerate cases gracefully.

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