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I am attempting to use strcmp() to test whether a particular line in a text file is equal to a new line character ("\n"). I am gathering each line from one text file, and writing them to another text file. I do not want to write the line in the target file if the entire line from the source file is simply a single new line character.

I would think that the code below would work for this purpose, but it does not. However, if I change the numeric value in the condition from 0 to 3, it works like I want it to work. Any idea why?

My goal is to change my condition so that it uses a numeric value of 0, meaning strcmp() finds an exact match, but I do not know how to change the other parts of my condition to do that.

#include <stdio.h>

void process_file(const char *inp_file, FILE *otp_fp) {

  char line[256];
  FILE *inp_fp = fopen(inp_file, "r");

  if (inp_fp != NULL) {
    while(fgets(line, 256, inp_fp) != NULL) {

      if (strcmp (line, "\n") != 0) { //changing to 3 gets desired result
        fprintf(otp_fp, line);
      }

    }
  }

  fclose(inp_fp);

}
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This works for me. Are there any other possible errors? –  squiguy Oct 28 '12 at 3:32
3  
Are your sure your lines done't end with CRLF as opposed to plain LF? Try strcmp(line, "\r\n") –  Troy Oct 28 '12 at 3:40
    
"\r\n" works, as you suggested. Thanks. I wonder why it works for squiguy in its original form. I will research further. –  nairware Oct 28 '12 at 3:50
    
@nairware I ran it using Linux, where \n is the line ending. You must be using Windows where \r\n is the line ending. –  squiguy Oct 28 '12 at 3:52
1  
If you were on Windows, the file is opened as a text file (because there was no b in the mode), so the CRLF would be mapped to NL on input. If a file is copied as a binary file from Windows to Unix (including Mac) then the CRLF endings are left unchanged. If you use FTP and specify text (ASCII) mode transfers, the CRLF endings are fixed once more. You have a decision to make; do you want your program to work on files that originate from Windows when your program runs on Unix? If so, then you need to compare for both line endings; if not, then choose your local ending. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 5:32
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2 Answers 2

The only explanation for the behavior you describe is that the lines aren't really empty. They must have some whitespace in them (like spaces or tabs.) If you want to omit such lines, then you must check whether they really consist only of whitespace or not.

(I also fixed a problem in your code where you would try to fclose() a NULL pointer if fopen() had failed. This also demonstrates how you can decrease the indentation level of a function by only running the code after error conditions have been dealt with.)

int str_is_whitespace(const char* line) {
    int onlyws = 1;
    int i = 0;
    while (onlyws && line[i] != '\0') {
        if (!isspace(line[i])) {
            onlyws = 0;
        }
        ++i;
    }
    return onlyws;
}

void process_file(const char *inp_file, FILE *otp_fp) {
    char line[256];
    FILE *inp_fp = fopen(inp_file, "r");
    if (inp_fp == NULL) {
        return;
    }
    while(fgets(line, 256, inp_fp) != NULL) {
        // Only output the text if it doesn't consist only of whitespace.
        if (!str_is_whitespace(line)) {
            fprintf(otp_fp, "%s", line);
        }
    }
    fclose(inp_fp);
}

You need to include <ctype.h> for isspace().

Note that you'll run into trouble with lines that are longer than 255 characters and fgets() happened to read the remaining part of a line that has only whitespace in it. If you want to deal with that, you need additional logic to determine whether the current text is actually part of a larger line.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void process_file(const char *inp_file, FILE *otp_fp) {

  char line[256];
  FILE *inp_fp ;
  size_t len;

  inp_fp = fopen(inp_file, "r");

  if (!inp_fp ) return;

  while(fgets(line, 256, inp_fp) != NULL) {
    len = strlen(line);
        /* skip trailing space */
    while (len && (line[len-1] == '\n' || line[len-1] == '\r')) {line[--len] = 0;}

    if (!len ) continue;
        /* dont use random strings as format argument for printf() et.al.
        ** (there could be '%' signs in it) 
        ** Note: the \r\n (if any) were removed, and now are re-added.
        ** This will impose the line-ending convention that the current platform uses.
        */
    fprintf(otp_fp, "%s\n", line);

  }

  fclose(inp_fp);

}
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