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I'm supposed to write a program that merges the numbers in two files and writes all the numbers into a third file. The program takes input from two different files and writes its output to a third file. Each input file contains a list of numbers of type int in sorted order from the smallest to the largest. After the program is run, the output file will contain all the numbers in the two input files in one longer list in sorted order from smallest to largest. I'm not 100% sure my logic is correct. Thank you for your help.

inputFile1:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

inputFile2:

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
int num1, num2;

ifstream inputFile;
ifstream inputFile2;
inputFile.open ("input1.txt");
inputFile2.open("input2.txt");
ofstream outputFile;
outputFile.open("output.txt");

inputFile >> num1;
inputFile2 >> num2;
while(inputFile.eof() && inputFile2.eof())
{
    if (num1 < num2)
    {
        outputFile << num1;
        inputFile >> num1;
    }
    else
    {       
        outputFile << num2;
        inputFile2 >> num2;
    }

}

inputFile.close();
inputFile2.close();
outputFile.close();

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you expect inputFile2.open(); to accomplish? Also, don't use while (!eof), use while (in >> var). –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 6:11
    
Can you explain what in >> var means? I've never learned that. I'm guessing var is just the variable that I'm using, but 'in'? –  user1742419 Oct 28 '12 at 6:14
    
It's just being generic. in would be the input stream, which, in your case, could be inputFile or inputFile2. –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 6:16
    
@user1742419 Were you taught to use while (!inputFile.eof())? –  john Oct 28 '12 at 6:19
    
Yes, but it seems like it's a taboo and I'm afraid to say yes to your question. –  user1742419 Oct 28 '12 at 6:23

3 Answers 3

If using the standard library is OK, then you can use merge:

int main()
{
    ifstream inputFile("input1.txt");
    ifstream inputFile2("input2.txt");
    ofstream outputFile("output.txt");

    typedef istream_iterator<int> IT;
    typedef ostream_iterator<int> OT;
    std::merge(IT(inputFile), IT(), IT(inputFile2), IT(), OT(outputFile, " "));

    outputFile.flush();
}

Also note that the i/ofstream constructor is capable of opening file during initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
This is by far my favourite solution shown, however I would do rid of the explicit closes, that will happen at destruction anyway, RAII is C++ strong point, lets use it! –  111111 Oct 28 '12 at 12:35
    
@111111: Getting rid of closes of inputFiles is OK, but getting rid of the close of outputFile -- Nah. I would replace it with a flush actually. Basically RAII has rollback semantics, whereas close() and flush() are commit semantics. (Not talking about atomicity here.) The flush may throw an error, so if you are closing a file during a normal flow you may want to get the possible exception thrown. –  ybungalobill Oct 28 '12 at 17:06
    
I am pretty sure that it flushes on destruction too. explicitly closing filestreams has the issue that you end up with named objects with an "invalid" state. –  111111 Oct 28 '12 at 17:11
    
@111111: Yes, it flushes, but you don't know whether it fails. Regarding invalid state, this is why I said that I would flush instead. –  ybungalobill Oct 28 '12 at 17:19
    
but, in the code you have presented .flush() is just returns the stream anyway, which you do not check, so how is that any different to just letting the destructor do it? If you had it in an if() with some sort of handling code I would agree. Also you are aware that flush doesn't actually write the data to disk, it just gives it to the OS, which is highly unlikely to fail. –  111111 Oct 28 '12 at 17:22
inputFile2.open();

should be

inputFile2.close();
share|improve this answer
    
Or just remove the explicit closes altogether, they are just a source of bugs. –  111111 Oct 28 '12 at 12:33

inputFile2.open(); is clearly a mistype for inputFile2.close();

But I'm afraid your logic is completely wrong. You haven't understood the point of the exercise. You are supposed to open both input files and the output file at the same time and you are not supposed to use an array to store and sort the numbers. If you do this right you will not need an array and will not need to do any sorting at all. That's the point of the exercise.

And to repeat what has already been said at least a million times on this forum. Do not use

while (!inputFile.eof())

It is incorrect. Do use

while (inputFile >> num)

This is a very basic sketch of how to do the merging. There's plenty of detail to fill in.

inFile1 >> num1;
inFile2 >> num2;
while (something or other)
{
  if (num1 < num2)
  {
    outFile << num1;
    inFile1 >> num1;
  }
  else
  {
    outFile << num2;
    inFile2 >> num2;
  }
}

There's an irony here, 'something or other' probably does involve using eof(). This is one occasion when using inFile.eof() is the right thing to do.

BTW the way your input data is not very good. Each file individually should be sorted but you shouldn't have all the numbers in file1 less than all the numbers in file2. That's not required.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't it be inputFile >> i? –  user1742419 Oct 28 '12 at 6:20
    
num and i are just variables, you can call them whatever you like. I used num just to mean number. –  john Oct 28 '12 at 6:21
    
The variables indicate what exactly? I think I might've used that space wrong, by putting 'i' in there. Does it matter what variable? –  user1742419 Oct 28 '12 at 6:24
    
Of course what variable you use matters for the logic of your program, if you read into the wrong variable your program isn't going to work. Are you having trouble with the concept of a variable? It's pretty fundamental, and you're going to struggle in the future if you don't have the concept clear. –  john Oct 28 '12 at 6:30
1  
Kind of, but you are outputting both numbers, as I said output the smaller number only. You don't know if the bigger number should be output yet because there might be another smaller number in the other file (as you said in your previous comment). Also it's while(inputFile>>num1 && inputFile2>>num2). –  john Oct 28 '12 at 7:02

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