Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can i make any function like

public void myfunc()
{
   //some processing
}

a thread function by

Thread t = new Thread (new ThreadStart (myfunc));

then some where

t.Start();

and can i pass any type of arguments to that?

share|improve this question
    
Please be more descriptive in your question –  almog.ori Aug 21 '09 at 8:25
    
You want to make the ThreadStart() ctor delegate parameter of type void MyFunc(void) ? –  cwap Aug 21 '09 at 8:29
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In theory you can make any method execute in a separate thread, as long as you follow some rules (e.g. synchronization, invoke delegates to update ui, etc.).

From your question I understand that you do not have much experience with multi threaded programming, so I advise you to read a lot about threading and learn about the dangers and problems that can arise. You may also use the background worker class that take some of the responsibilities from you.

Also, yes, you can pass parameters to a thread method:

private class ThreadParameters
{
   ....
}

...

public void ThreadFunc(object state)
{
    ThreadParameters params = (ThreadParameters)state;
    ....
}

Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(ThreadFunc));
t.Start(new ThreadParameters() { ... });
share|improve this answer

There is an overload that accepts an object state - however, IMO the easiest way to pass arbitrary arguments to a threadstart (and verify the signature at compile time) is with an anonymous method:

int a = ...
string b = ...
Thread t = new Thread (delegate() { SomeFunction(a,b);});

Just (and this is important) - *don't change a or b after this, as the change will be reflected to the thread (as a race) - i.e. don't do:

int a = ...
string b = ...
Thread t = new Thread (delegate() { SomeFunction(a,b);});
a = 12; // this change will be visible to the anonymous method - be careful ;-p

In the case of loops, it is important (when dealing with async and captured variables) to introduce extra variables for this; these are very different

    int[] data = {1,2,3,4,5};
    foreach(int i in data) {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate {
            Console.WriteLine(i); });
    }
    Console.ReadLine();

(which will probably print 5,5,5,5,5)

    int[] data = {1,2,3,4,5};
    foreach (int i in data) {
        int tmp = i;
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate {
            Console.WriteLine(tmp); });
    }
    Console.ReadLine();

(which will print 1-5 in no particular order)


Update to discuss Meeh's point (comments); what does this print (99.999% of the time - there is a race condition)?

    string s = "dreams";
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate {
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    });
    s = "reality";
    Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this answer
    
You can avoid the cast if you tell it explicitly that the delegate has no parameters, ie new Thread (delegate() { SomeFunction(a,b);}) –  Chris Chilvers Aug 21 '09 at 8:32
    
Tidied, cheers. –  Marc Gravell Aug 21 '09 at 8:34
    
Erm, aren't int an value-type and hence, being passed-by-value? Changing a after the thread has been created will not change the value the thread received, or am I wrong? Same thing goes for the string, though it's a reference type - So all you'd change would be the local scopes b-handle target. Using SomeFunction(ref a, ref b) would do what you said.. I'm not quite sure though, I ussually check stuff like this briefly on the fly :) –  cwap Aug 21 '09 at 8:35
    
I'll add an update just to show this... (at the bottom) –  Marc Gravell Aug 21 '09 at 8:38
    
(and it doesn't matter that string is a reference type; it is immutable - this isn't related to ref-type/value-type) –  Marc Gravell Aug 21 '09 at 8:39
protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (Session["intCompany_Accounting_Year_ID"] == null || Session["vcrAdmin_Id"] == null)
        {
            Response.Redirect("User_Login.aspx");
        }

        if (!IsPostBack)
        {
            ViewState["Page_Index"] =  Request.QueryString["Page_Index"];
            ViewState["ID_Field"] = Request.QueryString["ID_Field"];
            Initialize_Page();                
            Bind_Search_Grid();                
        }
    }
    protected void btnFind_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Bind_Search_Grid();
    }                               




protected void grdSearch_Result_RowDataBound(object sender, GridViewRowEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.Header)
    {
        Label lblHeader = (Label)e.Row.FindControl("lblHeader");
        lblHeader.Text = ViewState["Header_Name"].ToString();
    }
    else if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow)
    {
        LinkButton lnk = (LinkButton)e.Row.FindControl("lnkDisplay_Text");
        lnk.OnClientClick = "Close_Window('" + lnk.CommandArgument + "','" + ViewState["ID_Field"].ToString() 
            + "')";
    }

}
protected void grdSearch_Result_RowCreated(object sender, GridViewRowEventArgs e)
{
    e.Row.Cells[1].Visible = false;
    e.Row.Cells[2].Visible = false;
    e.Row.Cells[3].Visible = false;
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you intend this answer for a different question? I don't see how this code relates to the question. –  Paul Phillips Aug 1 '11 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.