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I couldn't really find a lot of resources online regarding the differences between managed and un-managed C++ code. However from the resources that I found it turns out managed C++ handles and clears memory allocated on its own contrary to what unmanaged C++ does. I currently have an exe application which uses a lot of boost and another dll library(s). Now I need to convert this exe to an unmanaged dll file. Could anyone tell me the differences between the managed and unmanaged and how could I decide if my current C++ .exe application would be easily portable ?

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Your question is... poorly specified. C++/CLI vs. C++ has nothing to do with whether you can put your code into a DLL. Your question really is, "I have some code in an exe. How do I put it into a DLL?" To answer that, you need to explain a lot more about what that code is. What do you want to do with that code when it's in a DLL? How do you plan to use it as a DLL? What's your interface? These are far more important than "managed" vs. real C++. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 28 '12 at 9:20
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closed as not a real question by Nicol Bolas, Bo Persson, M42, jonsca, Maerlyn Oct 28 '12 at 10:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

Unmanaged C++ is the same as C++.

Managed C++ is a proprietary language created by Microsoft that runs on the .NET platform and is used to glue together C++ code and .NET code.

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So is there anyway to tell if my application would run in an unmanaged dll without changes ? –  Casper_2211 Oct 28 '12 at 7:25
    
Perhaps you should post some typical code so someone can have a look and tell you. –  john Oct 28 '12 at 7:37
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