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I have made my own Objective-C base class to use in Objective-C projects (without Foundation/Cocoa classes or API). While I don't mind writing my own retains and releases, it's a tedious process so I'm wondering if I can use ARC with my custom classes.

Specifically:

  • Is it possible to use ARC with custom classes?
  • Do my reference-counting selectors have to be called retain and release (and autorelease)?
  • What additional requirements are there to make ARC work as expected for custom classes (other than including the -fobjc-arc argument when compiling)?
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Let me rephrase your question. You're trying to make your own root class with ARC??? –  TheAmateurProgrammer Oct 28 '12 at 9:32
    
I don't see why it wouldn't work. All ARC does is puts in retains and releases, which your root class has to implement. Are you seeing problems? If so, what problems? –  mattjgalloway Oct 28 '12 at 9:33
    
@TheAmateurProgrammer Yep, it works with standard retain-release calls. Getting ARC working will make future work much lighter though. –  Ephemera Oct 28 '12 at 10:31
    
What are you trying to accomplish by using your own root class? –  NSResponder Oct 28 '12 at 12:59
    
@NSResponder Eventually portability to Windows is the main goal, now that GCC (in MinGW) contains a reasonable ObjC2.0 runtime. –  Ephemera Oct 28 '12 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it possible to use ARC with custom classes?

Of course it is.

Do my reference-counting selectors have to be called retain and release (and autorelease)?

Yes, they do. Apple has hardcoded the method names of its favorite Objective-C library (Foundation) into the compiler. Damn bad programming pattern, isn't it?

What additional requirements are there to make ARC work as expected for custom classes (other than including the -fobjc-arc argument when compiling)?

As far as I know, nothing.

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Exactly what I needed to know, thanks :). I wondered if the retain/release names were hard-coded... I know they did it with the new container syntax... Ah well. –  Ephemera Oct 28 '12 at 10:13
    
@PLPiper yep, also @[] and @{} translates to a hard-coded selector name... What a shame! –  user529758 Oct 28 '12 at 10:14
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You can see the hardcoding of selector names in here - opensource.apple.com/source/objc4/objc4-493.9/runtime/… . Look at objc_retain for example. Also look at objc_rootRetain which is what NSObject and NSProxy use to handle reference counting. –  mattjgalloway Oct 28 '12 at 10:21
    
@mattjgalloway good piece of reference! +1. –  user529758 Oct 28 '12 at 10:22
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@PLPiper Yes, exactly! The language specification (Euhm, Objective-C doesn't have a standard like C and C++ have) should contain that "the underlying classes for the '@"", @<number>, @{} and @[]` constructs are to be specified at compile-time by the user and may have a vendor-specific default value that can be modified"... –  user529758 Oct 28 '12 at 10:40

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