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I've always heard C# uses lazy evaluation. So for certain code like, if (true || DoExpensiveOperation() will return true without executing DoExpensiveOperation().

On an interview test I saw the following questions,

static bool WriteIfTrue(bool argument)
{
    if (argument)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("argument is true!");
    }

    return argument;
}

static void Main()
{
    // 1              0                       0                 1
    WriteIfTrue((WriteIfTrue(false) & WriteIfTrue(true)) || WriteIfTrue(true));

    // 1               1                     0                      1
    WriteIfTrue((WriteIfTrue(true) || WriteIfTrue(false)) & WriteIfTrue(true));

    //  0                 0                  0                    0
    WriteIfTrue((WriteIfTrue(false) & WriteIfTrue(true)) & WriteIfTrue(false));

    // 1                1                      0                   1
    WriteIfTrue((WriteIfTrue(true) || WriteIfTrue(false)) & WriteIfTrue(true));
}

How many times would it print "argument is true!" to the screen?

I would say 7 is the correct answer. Now if I stick into the compiler and run it, it prints it 10 times! Where did lazy evaluation all go wrong?

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7  
Are those & or && operators? –  Dialecticus Oct 28 '12 at 9:33
3  
That's not lazy evaluation, it's short-circuiting. Also, you are mixing the bit-wise operators (&) with the logical operators (||). –  mike z Oct 28 '12 at 9:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I've always heard C# uses lazy evaluation.

That's far too vague a comment for me to agree with. If you'd said that the || and && operators in C# are short-circuiting, only evaluating the second operand if the overall result couldn't be determined just from the first operand, then I'd agree with it. Lazy evaluation is a more wide-ranging concept - for example, LINQ queries use lazy (or deferred) evaluation, not actually fetching any data until the result is used.

You're using the & operator, which isn't short-circuiting:

The & operator evaluates both operators regardless of the first one's value.

The && operator is short-circuiting:

The operation x && y corresponds to the operation x & y except that if x is false, y is not evaluated, because the result of the AND operation is false no matter what the value of y is.

Replace & with && everywhere in your code, and you'll see "argument is true!" printed 8 times (not 7 - count your comments again).

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Honestly can't remember now if it was an & or an && on the test. Would explain the unexpected behaviour though when I tested it, thanks! –  M Afifi Oct 28 '12 at 11:45

Much simpler version:

static bool WriteIfTrue(bool argument)

    {
        if (argument)
        {
             Console.Write(" T ");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.Write(" F ");
        }
        return argument;
    }

~~~~~~

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.Write("f(f(F) & f(T)) eval order:"); 
        WriteIfTrue(WriteIfTrue(false) & WriteIfTrue(true));

        Console.Write("\nf(f(F) && f(T)) eval order:");
        WriteIfTrue(WriteIfTrue(false) && WriteIfTrue(true));

        Console.Write("\nf(f(T) | f(F)) eval order:");
        WriteIfTrue(WriteIfTrue(true) | WriteIfTrue(false));

        Console.Write("\nf(f(T) || f(F)) eval order:");
        WriteIfTrue(WriteIfTrue(true) || WriteIfTrue(false));
    }

OUTPUT:

f(f(F) & f(T)) eval order: F T F
f(f(F) && f(T)) eval order: F F
f(f(T) | f(F)) eval order: T F T
f(f(T) || f(F)) eval order: T T

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