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Following code will compile but crash at run time:

int main() {

    try {
        throw;
    }
    catch(...){
        cout<<"In catch";
    }
     return 0;

}

Result: “Unhandled exception at 0x7c812a5b in hello.exe: Microsoft C++ exception: [rethrow] @ 0x00000000”

Why compiler allows the code to compile? it looks not so difficult job for compiler to check if this code is part of catch block or not.

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The compiler could warn, but only if the case is as simple as your example. Most real-world cases would be harder to detect. –  sbi Aug 21 '09 at 10:07
    
Thanks, I think i got the point, it is something like throwing null exception (there is nothing to re throw) and compiler is not supposed to do null checks for us. –  Learner Aug 27 '09 at 10:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From C++ Standard (15.1.8)

If no exception is presently being handled, executing a throw-expression with no operand calls std::terminate()

As standard allows it and gives clear semantics, a compiler can only conform to it.

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The standard allows lots of things that compiler writers may choose to give warnings about. –  anon Aug 21 '09 at 9:23
2  
The question was "Why compiler allows the code to compile?" It has to. Others gave examples where rethrowing in separate function may be useful. And creating special rules for checking main function, knowing it can't be called, is to much work for too little gain. –  Tadeusz Kopec Aug 21 '09 at 9:36

There are probably millions of errors that compilers could catch, if the compiler writers put enough work into them. But those compiler writers have to make judgements about whether that work is worthwhile. In this case, they decided not (and I agree with them).

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Not so easy. You could have called this function from inside a catch block in some other function.

A concept of so-called exception handler is described in this answer.

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2  
main() cannot be called in C++ –  anon Aug 21 '09 at 8:54
1  
At least in VC++7 it can be called. And the question doesn't insist on doing that specifically in main. –  sharptooth Aug 21 '09 at 8:58
    
The C++ Standard forbids it. –  anon Aug 21 '09 at 9:01
    
@Neil: Though technically correct. I am sure the compiler does not treat main() as special for checking in this context so it just looks like a function call, (and knowing windows they probably hash (pound for you Americans) defined it into something else). –  Loki Astari Aug 21 '09 at 9:40
    
Does the C++ standard forbid implementations from allowing main() to be called, or does it merely forbid programmers from calling it. The language is, "main() shall not be called", but since I've never implemented a C++ compiler, I've never really needed to know what that language means for implementations. If MSVC wants to allow main() to be called, and if that's OK, then the objection doesn't apply. –  Steve Jessop Aug 21 '09 at 11:11

You can put the throw in a function which is called from a catch block. Sometimes useful if you have a common handling for a class of exceptions:

void handleXExceptions()
{
   try {
      throw;
   } catch (XA&) {
      ...
   } catch (XB&) {
      ...
   } catch (X&) {
      assert("Update handleXExceptions" == NULL); 
   }
}

void f() {
   try {
      ...
   } catch (X&) {
      handleXExceptions();
   }
}

void g() {
   try {
      ...
   } catch (X&) {
      handleXExceptions();
   }
}
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Yeap, that's called an exception handler - stackoverflow.com/questions/980149/… –  sharptooth Aug 21 '09 at 8:58

Simply because the code is legal. You could say the same about:

int* p=0;
*p = 0;

and thousands of other examples. It's legal but very wrong.

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How should it know the caller of the function will not catch the exception?

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main() cannot be called in C++ –  anon Aug 21 '09 at 8:53

Thanks, I think i got the point, it is something like throwing null exception (there is nothing to re throw) and compiler is not supposed to do null checks for us.

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