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I am having trouble generating a HTML/CSS layout. The best way to think of it is to take a normal horizontally centered page layout. Only I want one div to extend beyond the centered layout to the right edge of the browser window.

This should work fluently with browser window resizing. The red plane in this image explains what I mean

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With some JS, probably. The difficult part is keeping the main parts centered. –  DanMan Oct 28 '12 at 10:41
    
Can you post what you got so far? It would be nice to see all HTML; CSS in jsFiddle. –  salih0vicX Oct 28 '12 at 10:48
    
I was unable to come up with a working solution. If i try to position the red plane independent of the other divs, the left margin has to be calculated: 400 + (window_width - 1080) / 2. This is something that CSS does not provide, so maybe through Javascript. If I try to position relative to the container, I can not break free to the right side. –  Roy Prins Oct 28 '12 at 11:00
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here are two CSS-only methods to achieve layouts like this. Both have been briefly tested in IE 7/8/9 and Chrome.

Example 1

Here's an example where you know the heights of all your elements.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/3RDuy/2/

HTML

<div id="top">Top</div>
<div id="left">Left</div>
<div id="right">Variable Right</div>
<div id="bottom">Bottom</div>

CSS

DIV { position: absolute; height: 100px; }
#top { width: 400px; left: 50%; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #aaa; }
#left{ width: 100px; left: 50%; top: 100px; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #bbb; }
#right{ left: 50%; right: 0; top: 100px; margin-left: -100px; background-color: #aa0000; }
#bottom{ left: 50%; width: 400px; top: 200px; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #aaa; }​

Example 2

Here's an example where you only know the height of the top and bottom.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/3RDuy/3/

HTML

<div id="top">Top</div>
<div id="left">Left</div>
<div id="right">Variable Right</div>
<div id="bottom">Bottom</div>

CSS

DIV { position: absolute; }
#top { width: 400px; left: 50%; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #aaa;  height: 100px; }
#left{ width: 100px; left: 50%; top: 100px; bottom: 100px; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #bbb; }
#right{ left: 50%; right: 0; top: 100px; margin-left: -100px; top: 100px; bottom: 100px; background-color: #aa0000; }
#bottom{ left: 50%; width: 400px; bottom: 0; margin-left: -200px; background-color: #aaa; height: 100px; }​

If you want variable heights on everything (including the ability to have a height greater than 100%) you will probably need to use JavaScript.

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Wow yeah, I was still stuck with "auto" for positioning centrally. Working from {left: 50%} solves a lot. Hats off to you guys for coming up with 4 valid solutions. –  Roy Prins Oct 28 '12 at 17:13
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This was a very interesting challenge.

I needed a similar effect several months ago with an element extending out of the container to the window's edge, but did not need that space available for content - it was merely a design effect.

Tim's answer is solid, but needing to know the height of an element is not practical. My solution eliminates this requirement.

Making use of a wrapper, some padding and negative margins, we can manipulate our layout to replicate the desired functionality.

Markup:

<div class="header">
    <h1>Hello World!</h1>
</div>

<div class="content">
    <div class="a">A</div>
    <div class="b">B</div>
</div>

<div class="footer">
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.</p>
</div>​

CSS:

.header,
.footer {
    clear: both;
    margin: auto;
    width: 600px; /* Your container width */
    background: grey;
    }

.content {
    float: right;
    width: 50%;
    padding-left: 300px; /* Half of your container width */
    }

.a {
    float: left;
    margin-left: -300px; /* Half of your container width */
    width: 200px;
    height: 10em;  /* Not required, set for visual */
    background: red;
    }

.b {
    margin-left: -100px; /* The difference between half your container width and element A */
    height: 10em; /* Not required, set for visual */
    background: yellow;
    }

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/rkW9J/

It should be noted that this hasn't been tested extensively cross-browser, but doesn't implement any obvious layout quirks so we should be good.

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+1 as this is an interesting solution, but the columns may end up with uneven heights. For example: jsfiddle.net/rkW9J/1. Not sure if that matters to the OP. –  Tim Medora Oct 28 '12 at 14:30
    
This solution would absolutely work for me. Very elegant, makes me feel stupid I was unable to come up with something like this. Nice learning experience just the same. –  Roy Prins Oct 28 '12 at 17:04
    
@TimMedora Oh yes, I forgot to mention the solution does not take in to consideration equal height columns. Thanks for pointing that out. –  amustill Oct 28 '12 at 20:21
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Can't find a solution width pure CSS, but here's how to do it with javascript / jquery.

Demo

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
<div id="header"> 1080px </div>
<div id="left"> 400px </div>
<div id="right"> full width </div>
<div id="footer"> 1080px </div>
</div>​

CSS:

#wrapper { width:1080px; margin:0 auto; }
#header, #footer { clear:both; }
#left { float:left; width:400px; margin-right:10px; }

jQuery:

var right = $('#right'),
    left = $('#left');

$(window).on('resize',positionRightDiv);

function positionRightDiv(){
    var posLeft = left.offset().left + left.outerWidth(true),
        posTop = left.offset().top;
    right.css({'position':'absolute','left':posLeft,'top':posTop,'right':0});
}
positionRightDiv();

Note: for this method to work, #wrapper must not have position:relative; nor overlow:hidden;


P.S. Nice atom heart mother profile pic ;-)

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I keep overlooking how much more convenient jQuery makes javascript stuff. Easy to shoot yourself in the foot actually without jQuery because of the different browser implementations. Thanks for your solution, guess I will have to educate myself more on js/jQuery. –  Roy Prins Oct 28 '12 at 16:53
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