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Assume I have a class like so:

public class MyClass<T>
{
    public void Foo(T t)
    {
    }
}

Now, assume, I have an instance of MyClass<int> and a MethodInfo of its Foo method. Calling methodInfo.GetParameters() will return a ParameterInfo array with one entry, referring to type int. My problem is, that I can't seem to find out, if that parameter was declared as int in the class or as T.

What am I trying to achieve?
At runtime, I want to read the documentation of the method specified by MethodInfo from the XML Doc file generated by Visual Studio.
For the above defined method, the key looks like this:

<namespace>.MyClass`1.Foo(`0)

The `0 refers to the first generic type parameter of the declaring class. To be able to construct this string, I need to somehow get this information.
But how? MethodInfo doesn't seem to contain that info...

share|improve this question
    
Advanced reflection techniques usually requires falling back to IMetaDataImport2. Not that easy to use from C#. –  Hans Passant Oct 28 '12 at 15:06
    
@HansPassant: Would this interface support my scenario? –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 28 '12 at 19:55
    
So if your method was "public void Foo(int i, T t, string s)", you would want to get something like "<namespace>.MyClass1.Foo(int, 0, string)"? –  user276648 Nov 20 '12 at 3:00
    
@user276648: Correct. –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 20 '12 at 8:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The key seems to be Type.ContainsGenericParameters on the parameter type:

Given

public class MyClass<T>
{
    public void Foo(T t)
    {
    }

    public void Bar(int i)
    {

    }
}

Then

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var obj = new MyClass<int>();

        // Closed type
        var closedType = obj.GetType();

        // Open generic (typeof(MyClass<>))
        var openType = closedType.GetGenericTypeDefinition();

        // Methods on open type
        var fooT = openType.GetMethod("Foo");
        var barint = openType.GetMethod("Bar");

        // Parameter types
        var tInFoo = fooT.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType;
        var iInBar = barint.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType;

        // Are they generic?
        var tInFooIsGeneric = tInFoo.ContainsGenericParameters;
        var iInBarIsGeneric = iInBar.ContainsGenericParameters;

        Console.WriteLine(tInFooIsGeneric);
        Console.WriteLine(iInBarIsGeneric);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

outputs

True
False

This will obviously need more work for overloads and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
Aha! That looks pretty good. Will check it later in detail. Thanks! –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 22 '12 at 11:24
    
Sorry for taking so long to accept your answer. It was spot on. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 24 '13 at 13:48
    
How can I get the correct MethodInfo if I have overloads of the Foo method? GetMethod throws an AmbiguousMatchException. GetMethod needs to receive the parameters type but I can't find the generic parameter from the MethodInfo closed type –  Alexandre Pepin Sep 9 '14 at 13:44
    
@AlexandrePepin then use Type.GetMethods with a Where(mi => mi.Name="Whatever"), then further filters to pick the one you want. Ask your own question if you need more after you've tried this... –  AakashM Sep 9 '14 at 13:53

Could you get the definition of the generic class through Type.GetGenericTypeDefinition Method and find there the definition for the same method, say, by name (and the signature), and then compare Foo(T t) and Foo(int t):

MyClass<int> c = new MyClass<int>();

Type concreteType = c.GetType();
Console.Write("Concrete type name:");
Console.WriteLine(concreteType.FullName);
Console.WriteLine();

MethodInfo concreteMethod = concreteType.GetMethod("Foo");
if (concreteMethod != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(concreteMethod.Name);
    foreach (ParameterInfo pinfo in concreteMethod.GetParameters())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(pinfo.Name);
        Console.WriteLine(pinfo.ParameterType);
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

if (concreteType.IsGenericType)
{
    Console.Write("Generic type name:");
    Type genericType = concreteType.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
    Console.WriteLine(genericType.FullName);
    Console.WriteLine();

    MethodInfo genericMethod = genericType.GetMethod("Foo");
    if (genericMethod != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(genericMethod.Name);
        foreach (ParameterInfo pinfo in genericMethod.GetParameters())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(pinfo.Name);
            Console.WriteLine(pinfo.ParameterType);
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about that too, but I am not really sure how that would work out with overloaded methods. –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 28 '12 at 12:52
    
@DanielHilgarth, agree that could be a tricky thing to find correspondent methods' overloads. Yet I don't see the other way out either. –  horgh Oct 28 '12 at 13:16

I don't know if you have considered using Mono.Cecil instead of .Net's reflection.

// Gets the AssemblyDefinition (similar to .Net's Assembly).
Type testType = typeof(MyClass<>);
AssemblyDefinition assemblyDef = AssemblyDefinition.ReadAssembly(new Uri(testType.Assembly.CodeBase).LocalPath);
// Gets the TypeDefinition (similar to .Net's Type).
TypeDefinition classDef = assemblyDef.MainModule.Types.Single(typeDef => typeDef.Name == testType.Name);
// Gets the MethodDefinition (similar to .Net's MethodInfo).
MethodDefinition myMethodDef = classDef.Methods.Single(methDef => methDef.Name == "Foo");

then myMethodDef.FullName returns

"System.Void MyNamespace.MyClass`1::Foo(System.Int32,T,System.String)"

and classDef.GenericParameters[0].FullName returns

"T"

Note that Mono.Cecil uses a different way of writing generics, nested classes and arrays:

List[T] => List<T>
MyClass+MyNestedClass => MyClass/MyNestedClass
int[,] => int[0...,0...]
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I already have a MethodInfo object for which I need to retrieve that info. –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 22 '12 at 9:46

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