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Here is my code - i am simply checking my MySQL database connection.
But first i have compiled and run the program successfully. but then i have commented the line Class.forName .
Still when i compile it runs successfully, without any error.Why?

import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.DriverManager;


public class FirstJbdc {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	Connection cn=null;
    	try {
    		//Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver");
    		System.out.println("Driver loaded successfully");
    		cn=DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:odbc:myDSN","root", "java");
    		System.out.println("Database connected successfully....");
    		System.out.println(cn);
    	} catch (Exception e) {
    		// TODO: handle exception
                        e.printStackTrace();
    	}
    }
}
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lovely: the answer is in the question // TODO: handle exception –  Peter Aug 21 '09 at 9:24
    
FirstJdbc you mean.. :) I have an answer below. :) –  DragonBorn Aug 21 '09 at 15:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Java 1.6 can find JDBC driver even without using Class.forName.

Here is relevant part of documentation:

The DriverManager methods getConnection and getDrivers have been enhanced to support the Java Standard Edition Service Provider mechanism. JDBC 4.0 Drivers must include the file META-INF/services/java.sql.Driver. This file contains the name of the JDBC drivers implementation of java.sql.Driver. For example, to load the my.sql.Driver class, the META-INF/services/java.sql.Driver file would contain the entry:

my.sql.Driver

Applications no longer need to explictly load JDBC drivers using Class.forName(). Existing programs which currently load JDBC drivers using Class.forName() will continue to work without modification.

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Hey Peter - please can you point to the docs that detail this, been searching but can't find anything - cheers Nick. –  Nick Holt Aug 21 '09 at 9:20
    
Don't you have to put the JDBC driver in a special folder for this to work? –  pjp Aug 21 '09 at 9:20
    
@pjp - would've thought you'd have to do something like putting the driver in a 'special folder'. Otherwise you'd be trawling through every class checking for which ones implement java.sql.Driver. which is gonna suck. –  Nick Holt Aug 21 '09 at 9:26
    
@Nick: check out Javadoc for DriverManager in JDK 1.6, especially part beginning with "The DriverManager methods getConnection and getDrivers have been enhanced to support the Java Standard Edition Service Provider mechanism." –  Peter Štibraný Aug 21 '09 at 9:28
    
@Peter: cheers, that's a tick on my learnt something new today list :-) –  Nick Holt Aug 21 '09 at 9:45

I throws an error, alright. It's just that the

catch (Exception e){
     // here the exception is instantiated, but nothing is done about it
}

clause silently swallows your exception.

Try a

System.out.println( e.getMessage() );

in the catch clause

share|improve this answer
    
Or e.printStackTrace(); –  pjp Aug 21 '09 at 9:22
    
Agree - it runs without (displaying) an error but it does not run successfully (doesn't print the last two lines). Never ever ever (...) catch 'Exception' without handling it ;) –  Andreas_D Aug 21 '09 at 9:24
    
tried handling exception but still it's running successfully –  RubyDubee Aug 21 '09 at 9:27
    
@peter - can you give any link related to this! –  RubyDubee Aug 21 '09 at 9:30
    
@Pradyumna Dandwate: Maybe you can edit the question with your updated code. Not sure what you meant by "tried handling exception." –  tim_wonil Aug 21 '09 at 9:32

NOTE: this only applies to pre-JDBC 4.0 Drivers.

JDBC drivers are meant to have a static section that registers them with the java.sql.DriverManager when the class is loaded, hence the Class.forName(String) is required.

It's detailed here: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/guide/jdbc/getstart/drivermanager.html

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try {

     //Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver");
      System.out.println("Driver loaded successfully");
      cn=DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:odbc:myDSN","root", "java");
      System.out.println("Database connected successfully....");
      System.out.println(cn);
} catch (Exception e) {
    // add the following statement
    System.out.println(e.getMessage());
}

If you add the statement inside the catch block, then compile and run, you should see the error message like-

[Some Com][Some Driver Manager] Data source name not found and no default driver specified

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Without Class.forName(), the JDBC-ODBC bridge driver is not loaded. By JDBC specification, getConnection() returns null if no driver is found for the URL, no exception is thrown. So this is expected behavior.

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1  
Except if you're using JDBC 4.0 (Java 6), because there it's not necessary anymore to load the driver with Class.forName(...). See the JavaDoc of java.sql.DriverManager. –  Jesper Aug 21 '09 at 10:23
    
The JDBC-ODBC driver from Sun is so old. It doesn't know the new tricks. –  ZZ Coder Aug 21 '09 at 11:01
    
Oh yes, it does. Check out META-INF/services/ava.sql.Driver file inside jre/lib/resources.jar -- it contains "sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver", i.e. JDBC-ODBC driver from Sun! So it can be definitely used without Class.forName() on Java 6. –  Peter Štibraný Aug 21 '09 at 18:09
    
You are right. I forgot we use a customized version of the driver. –  ZZ Coder Aug 21 '09 at 19:45

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