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I would like to search for numbers in existing list. If is one of this numbers repeated then set variable's value to true and break for loop.

list = [3, 5, 3] //numbers in list

So if the function gets two same numbers then break for - in this case there is 3 repeated.

How to do that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could look into sets. You loop through your list, and either add the number to a support set, or break out the loop.

>>> l = [3, 5, 3]
>>> s = set()
>>> s
set([])
>>> for x in l:
...     if x not in s:
...         s.add(x)
...     else:
...         break

You could also take a step further and make a function out of this code, returning the first duplicated number you find (or None if the list doesn't contain duplicates):

def get_first_duplicate(l):
    s = set()
    for x in l:
        if x not in s:
            s.add(x)
        else:
            return x

get_first_duplicate([3, 5, 3])
# returns 3

Otherwise, if you want to get a boolean answer to the question "does this list contain duplicates?", you can return it instead of the duplicate element:

def has_duplicates(l):
    s = set()
    for x in l:
        if x not in s:
            s.add(x)
        else:
            return true
    return false

get_first_duplicate([3, 5, 3])
# returns True

senderle pointed out:

there's an idiom that people sometimes use to compress this logic into a couple of lines. I don't necessarily recommend it, but it's worth knowing:

s = set(); has_dupe = any(x in s or s.add(x) for x in l)
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As you may be aware, there's an idiom that people sometimes use to compress this logic into a couple of lines. I don't necessarily recommend it, but it's worth knowing: s = set(); has_dupe = any(x in s or s.add(x) for x in lst) –  senderle Oct 28 '12 at 12:58
    
@senderle I didn't know it. I personally prefer the sparse (vs dense) version, but it's nice to know it. I'll add it to the answer; thank you for sharing. –  Nadir Sampaoli Oct 28 '12 at 13:10

First, don't name your list list. That is a Python built-in, and using it as a variable name can give undesired side effects. Let's call it L instead.

You can solve your problem by comparing the list to a set version of itself.

Edit: You want true when there is a repeat, not the other way around. Code edited.

def testlist(L):
    return sorted(set(L)) != sorted(L)
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2  
+1 for simplicity –  Thijs van Dien Oct 28 '12 at 12:01

you can use collections.Counter() and any():

>>> lis=[3,5,3]
>>> c=Counter(lis)
>>> any(x>1 for x in c.values()) # True means yes some value is repeated
True
>>> lis=range(10)
>>> c=Counter(lis)
>>> any(x>1 for x in c.values()) # False means all values only appeared once
False

or use sets and match lengths:

In [5]: lis=[3,3,5]

In [6]: not (len(lis)==len(set(lis)))
Out[6]: True

In [7]: lis=range(10)

In [8]: not (len(lis)==len(set(lis)))
Out[8]: False
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1  
You return the exact opposite of what OP asks - False when there is a repeat instead of True. –  Junuxx Oct 28 '12 at 12:06
    
That can easily be changes by appending a notif the OP desires, and I explained the meaning of True,False for both cases in comments. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 28 '12 at 12:08
1  
@Junuxx is right, and I think you should fix that. But this is a good solution if you fix that problem, because it may often be faster than sorting. –  senderle Oct 28 '12 at 12:08
    
Agreed with both, +1 –  Junuxx Oct 28 '12 at 12:14

without additional memory:

any(l.count(x) > 1 for x in l)
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1  
But slow -- O(n ** 2) instead of O(n). –  senderle Oct 28 '12 at 12:09

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