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In C++ is there a way to pass a type (e.g. a class) as parameter to a function?

Explanation why I need this: There is a abstract data class and a manager class. The manager class contains a list (or in this case a map) of objects of derived classes of data. I use unique_ptr for this as mentioned in the answer of this question.

class Data{}; // abstract

class Manager
{
    map<string, unique_ptr<Data>> List;
};

Now imagine I want to add a new data storage to the manager.

class Position : public Data
{
    int X;
    int Y;
}

How could I tell the manager to create a object of that type and refer an unique_ptr to it?

Manager manager;
manager.Add("position data", Position);

In this case I would need to pass the class Position to the add function of the manager class since I don't want to have to first create an instance and then send it to the manager.

And then, how could I add the object of that class to the List?

I am not sure if there is a way of doing that in C++. If that can't be done easily I would really like to see a workaround. Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using templates? –  Coding Mash Oct 28 '12 at 14:08
    
No I haven't since I am not familiar with using templates. But I have an open mind about using them and learning more about them. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:12
3  
I think that the answers below offer good solution with templates. –  Coding Mash Oct 28 '12 at 14:25
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use templates. In each type deriving from Data you will have to define a 'creator' function, which have the following prototype: Derived* create(). It will be called internally (you can also return a unique_ptr, but that would requires more memory).

Ex:

struct Position: public Data
{
    // ...
    static Position* create()
    {
        return new Position();
    }
};

The Add method will be:

template<typename D>
void Add(String str)
{
    List.insert(std::make_pair(str, std::unique_ptr<Data>(D::create())));
}

Then you use it like this:

Manager manager;
manager.Add<Position>("position data");

EDIT

You can also get rid of the create functions, by using this Add method:

template<typename D>
void Add(String str)
{
    List.insert(std::make_pair(str, std::unique_ptr<Data>(new D())));
}

Advantage: less code in data structure code.

Inconvenient: data structures have less control on how they're built.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a nice solution, too. But is there a way of getting rid of that create function? (Maybe move it to the base class somehow?) –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:19
    
Yes, you can directly use new D(). Less control from the structure, but more easy to implement. See edit. –  Synxis Oct 28 '12 at 14:23
    
Looks nice, but there is a compiler error. Binary Operator '=': There was no operator found which accepts an operand of type 'Position *'. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:29
1  
Yes that was code only to show what you should do 'self-documenting code). Editing this. –  Synxis Oct 28 '12 at 14:30
    
Thanks that works now. (By the way you missed one ) in both lines.) –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:34
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What about something like this:

class Manager
{
 public:
  template <typename T>
  void addData(const std::string& title)
  {
    List.insert(std::make_pair(title, std::unique_ptr<Data>(new T));
  }
 private:   
  map<string, unique_ptr<Data>> List;
};

then

Manager manager;
manager.addData<Position>("position data");
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice. It there any way to restrict typename T to be derived from Data? –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:16
2  
@sharethis well, if T wasn't derived from Data, std::unique_ptr<Data>(new T) would give compilation problems, unless there was a conversion from T to Data. –  juanchopanza Oct 28 '12 at 14:20
    
Thanks for explanation! –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:22
1  
@sharethis if you really want to make sure, and you have C++11 support, you can use std::is_base_of together with static_assert. Boost provides c++03 alternatives. –  juanchopanza Oct 28 '12 at 14:26
1  
@sharethis something like static_assert(std::is_base_of<Data, T>::value, "T is not derived from Data"); but actually, I can't think of a situation where the code above would compile unless T is a base of Data. –  juanchopanza Oct 28 '12 at 16:03
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Using unique_ptr means committing to working with dynamically allocated objects. (Not quite true: you could supply a custom deleter that doesn't call delete, but that becomes part of the type; this means you would be committing to working with non-dynamically allocated objects.)

void Manager::Add(String title, unique_ptr<Data> d) {
    List[title] = d;
}

Call it as:

Manager manager;
unique_ptr<Data> pos(new Position);
// Set it up
manager.Add("position data", pos);

Note: If you want to be able to do anything with your data objects, you probably want to declare at least one virtual function inside class Data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Maybe unique_ptr isn't the right option to go for me. Because I want to provide a manager.Get(string Name); returning a pointer to that data object. What do you think? –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:15
1  
Whoops, I forgot that List is actually a map :-P I've edited the Add() implementation to fix that. unique_ptr behaves just like a pointer, so you can still write unique_ptr<Data> Manager::Get(String title) { return List[title]; }, exactly as you would for a plain pointer. All unique_ptr does is make sure that dynamically allocated pointees are cleaned up automatically. –  j_random_hacker Oct 28 '12 at 14:20
    
So there wouldn't be a problem since there were two pointers then? One in the list of the manager and one returned by the get function. That doesn't sound like a unique pointer. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:21
1  
Ah. If you want to let the caller of Get() have access to the object without claiming ownership of it, I would suggest using a reference instead: Data& Manager::Get(String title) { return *List[title]; }. You could alternatively use a plain pointer (this can be obtained by calling get() on a unique_ptr). –  j_random_hacker Oct 28 '12 at 14:27
1  
Glad to hear it :) –  j_random_hacker Oct 28 '12 at 15:03
show 1 more comment

Define the function as following:

void Manager::Add(String title,Position pos){ /*snip*/ }

Then you can use the function as following:

Manager manager;
Position posData;
//setup the posData
manager.Add("position data",posData);
share|improve this answer
    
I can't do that. Since the manager must be able to store all types derived from data what I need is an generalized solution. Moreover I don't want to create an instance in my main function. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:01
    
You could pass temporary Position class that you insert into the map. –  Lauri Oct 28 '12 at 14:03
    
I could but if there is a way of not doing that I would prefer that. Nevertheless, the manager must be able to add every possible object of a derived class of data, not just Position. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 14:05
    
Then Position could be just changed to Data. But it seems like you will find the answer you like from the other answers. –  Lauri Oct 28 '12 at 14:10
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