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I hope the headline isn't too confusing. What I have is a class StorageManager containing a list of objects of classes derived from Storage. Here is an example.

struct Storage {};                         // abstract

class StorageManager
{
private:
    map<string, unique_ptr<Storage>> List; // store all types of storage

public:
    template <typename T>
    void Add(string Name)                  // add new storage with name
    {
        List.insert(make_pair(Name, unique_ptr<Storage>(new T())));
    }

    Storage* Get(string Name)              // get storage by name
    {
        return List[Name].get();
    }
};

Say Position is a special storage type.

struct Position : public Storage
{
    int X;
    int Y;
};

Thanks to the great answers on my last question the Add function already works. What I want to improve is the Get function. It reasonable returns a pointer Storage* what I can use like the following.

int main()
{
    StorageManager Manager;
    Manager.Add<Position>("pos");    // add a new storage of type position

    auto Strge = Manager.Get("pos"); // get pointer to base class storage
    auto Pstn = (Position*)Strge;    // convert pointer to derived class position

    Pstn->X = 5;
    Pstn->Y = 42;
}

It there a way to get rid of this pointer casting by automatically returning a pointer to the derived class? Maybe using templates?

share|improve this question
    
if Storage is to be base class, then please give it a virtual destructor. –  Darren Smith Oct 28 '12 at 15:15
    
Thanks for your advice. I will use that in my real code. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 15:21
    
Note: the idea of using List[Name] will cause embarrassment. For map and unordered_map, operator [] will create the value (calling the default constructor) if it is not present already. Therefore, if you try to Get with a name that does not exist, the pointer is created, leading to a "leak" of elements. –  Matthieu M. Oct 28 '12 at 15:39
    
@MatthieuM. The good thing is that BigBoss provided a better solution to me. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 15:41
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use:

template< class T >
T* Get(std::string const& name)
{
    auto i = List.find(name);
    return i == List.end() ? nullptr : static_cast<T*>(i->second.get());
}

And then in your code:

Position* p = Manager.Get<Position>("pos");
share|improve this answer
1  
Oh yes, because <Position> is so much better than (Position*)... –  Xirdus Oct 28 '12 at 15:17
    
@Xirdus I don't see how that can be improved. You use type erasure and still want the static type? You will need to say it? –  pmr Oct 28 '12 at 15:19
4  
It would be better to use dynamic_cast here rather than static_cast. Using static_cast for downcasting is playing with fire -- and with undefined behavior. –  David Hammen Oct 28 '12 at 15:23
    
This is better, at least a bit. But of course it would be much better to don't have to specify the type at all (in the main function). –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 15:24
1  
@sharethis According to standard C++, in dynamic_cast<T>(v), v shall be a pointer to or an lvalue of a polymorphic type. And in your case if your base class is not a polymorphic type(has no virtual function) at best case dynamic_cast work like static_cast –  BigBoss Oct 28 '12 at 15:39
show 14 more comments

I don't see what you can do for your Get member function besides what @BigBoss already pointed out, but you can improve your Add member to return the used storage.

template <typename T>
T* Add(string Name)                  // add new storage with name
{
   T* t = new T();
   List.insert(make_pair(Name, unique_ptr<Storage>(t)));
   return t;
}

// create the pointer directly in a unique_ptr
template <typename T>
T* Add(string Name)                  // add new storage with name
{
  std::unique_ptr<T> x{new T{}};
  T* t = x.get();
  List.insert(make_pair(Name, std::move(x)));
  return t;
}

EDIT The temporary prevents us from having to dynamic_cast. EDIT2 Implement MatthieuM's suggestion.

You can also further improve the function by accepting a value of the type to be inserted, with a default argument, but that might incur an additional copy.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice improvement. I will use that. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 15:30
    
In general, I would advise against naked pointers. In this very situation there is no risk of leak, but it would better to build the unique_ptr right away. –  Matthieu M. Oct 28 '12 at 15:35
    
@MatthieuM. Could you illustrate this idea? –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 15:37
    
@sharethis I added something similar. –  pmr Oct 28 '12 at 16:08
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When you have a pointer or reference to an object of some class, all you know is that the actual runtime object it references is either of that class or of some derived class. auto cannot know the runtime type of an object at compile time, because the piece of code containing the auto variable could be in a function that is run twice -- once handling an object of one runtime type, another handling an object with a different runtime type! The type system can't tell you what exact types are in play in a language with polymorphism -- it can only provide some constraints.

If you know that the runtime type of an object is some particular derived class (as in your example), you can (and must) use a cast. (It's considered preferable to use a cast of the form static_cast<Position*>, since casts are dangerous, and this makes it easier to search for casts in your code.)

But generally speaking, doing this a lot is a sign of poor design. The purpose of declaring a base class and deriving other class types from it is to enable objects of all of these those types to be treated the same way, without casting to a particular type.

  • If you want to always have the correct derived type at compile time without ever using casts, you have no choice but to use a separate collection of that type. In this case, there is probably no point deriving Position from Storage.
  • If you can rearrange things so that everything that a caller of StorageManager::Get() needs to do with a Position can be done by calling functions that don't specify Position-specific information (such as co-ordinates), you can make these functions into virtual functions in Storage, and implement Position-specific versions of them in Position. For example, you could make a function Storage::Dump() which writes its object to stdout. Position::Dump() would output X and Y, while the implementations of Dump() for other conceivable derived classes would output different information.
  • Sometimes you need to be able to work with an object that could be one of several essentially unrelated types. I suspect that may be the case here. In that case, boost::variant<> is a good way to go. This library provides a powerful mechanism called the Visitor pattern, which allows you to specify what action should be taken for each of the types that a variant object could possibly be.
share|improve this answer
    
I agree. In general I'd much rather see the casts in the code rather than hiding them behind some mechanism. It's better not to have to use casts at all. Sometimes it is hard to avoid using casts as there are valid use cases for reflection. Even when the usage is justified, those casts should be exposed. –  David Hammen Oct 28 '12 at 17:06
    
Your suggestions appear reasonable but there are strong reasons why I decided to use that design. Every of your suggestions to improve the code would completely eliminate these benefits. However thanks for your detailed answer. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 19:57
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Apart from the fact that this looks like a terrible idea... let's see what we can do to improve the situation.

=> It's a bad idea to require default construction

template <typename T>
T& add(std::string const& name, std::unique_ptr<T> element) {
    T& t = *element;
    auto result = map.insert(std::make_pair(name, std::move(element)));
    if (result.second == false) {
        // FIXME: somehow add the name here, for easier diagnosis
        throw std::runtime_error("Duplicate element");
    }
    return t;
}

=> It's a bad idea to downcast blindly

template <typename T>
T* get(std::string const& name) const {
    auto it = map.find(name);
    return it != map.end() ? dynamic_cast<T*>(it->second.get()) : nullptr;
}

But frankly, this system is quite full of holes. And probably unnecessary in the first place. I encourage you to review the general problem an come up with a much better design.

share|improve this answer
    
@pmr: good call. –  Matthieu M. Oct 28 '12 at 16:23
    
+1, and +more if I could. All in all, this is just a bad idea. –  David Hammen Oct 28 '12 at 16:59
1  
Maybe I will understand why this is a horrible idea sometimes. But for now I will go with this approach and it is exactly what I wanted to have. –  danijar Oct 28 '12 at 20:02
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