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atan2(y,x) has that discontinuity at 180° where it switches to -180°..0° going clockwise.

How do I map the range of values to 0°..360°?

here is my code:

CGSize deltaPoint = CGSizeMake(endPoint.x - startPoint.x, endPoint.y - startPoint.y);
float swipeBearing = atan2f(deltaPoint.height, deltaPoint.width);

I'm calculating the direction of a swiping touch event given the startPoint and endPoint, both XY point structs. The code is for the iPhone but any language that supports atan2f() will do.

Thanks for your help guys, with both the general solution and code.

Update: I made erikkallen's answer into a function with nice long variable names so I'll comprehend it 6 months from now. Maybe it will help some other iPhone noob.

float PointPairToBearingDegrees(CGPoint startingPoint, CGPoint endingPoint)
{
    CGPoint originPoint = CGPointMake(endingPoint.x - startingPoint.x, endingPoint.y - startingPoint.y); // get origin point to origin by subtracting end from start
    float bearingRadians = atan2f(originPoint.y, originPoint.x); // get bearing in radians
    float bearingDegrees = bearingRadians * (180.0 / M_PI); // convert to degrees
    bearingDegrees = (bearingDegrees > 0.0 ? bearingDegrees : (360.0 + bearingDegrees)); // correct discontinuity
    return bearingDegrees;
}
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Note: The posted update method will not return zero degrees, but values from just above 0 to 360.0. –  chux Sep 27 '13 at 2:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 22 down vote accepted
(x > 0 ? x : (2*PI + x)) * 360 / (2*PI)

Edit: Oops, wrong sign.

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2  
That's wrong, the sign of x should be positive. –  starblue Aug 21 '09 at 12:56
    
Probably also want x >= 0 for the x = 0 case. –  bpw1621 Nov 19 '11 at 16:14
4  
For those not comfortable with this notation, and without the conversion to degrees built in: if(x>0) {radians = x;} else {radians = 2*PI + x;} so we are just adding 2PI to the result if it is less than 0. –  David Doria Sep 25 '12 at 19:05
    
Or (x >= 0 ? x : (2*PI + x)) * 180/PI as in (x < 0 ? 2*PI + x : x) * 180/PI –  user3342816 Nov 9 '14 at 9:06

Or if you don't like branching, just negate the two parameters and add 180° to the answer.

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2  
Thanks, this is just what I was looking for. –  Jeremy Herrman Nov 22 '11 at 6:58
2  
+1 for simple code, but not as straightforward to grok. –  Fuhrmanator Apr 21 '12 at 2:14
1  
I'd rather modify my code to use denormalized angles (<0, >=360) but there always seems to be someone aiming for that fake "optimized" feel; that's why I wanted to add this. (Or was it because this was the quicker way around some temporary debug code I used? hmm) –  aib Apr 22 '12 at 0:26
    
Definitely not straightforward to grok, as I can concur after 2+ years. So: Adding 180° to the return value puts it nicely in the 0-360 range, but flips the angle. Negating both input parameters flips it back. –  aib Nov 19 '14 at 10:57
    
This can have some issues when $x = 0$ and $y > 0$ iirc –  Trinidad Feb 10 at 11:44

Just add 360° if the answer from atan2 is less than 0°.

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1  
Which is the same as "just add 2 * PI" if you're having one of those days. –  Chris O Oct 8 '14 at 14:43

@erikkallen is close but not quite right.

theta_rad = atan2(y,x);
theta_deg = (theta_rad/M_PI*180) + (theta_rad > 0 ? 0 : 360);

This should work in C++: (depending on how fmod is implemented, it may be faster or slower than the conditional expression)

theta_deg = fmod(atan2(y,x)/M_PI*180,360);

Alternatively you could do this:

theta_deg = atan2(-y,-x)/M_PI*180 + 180;

since (x,y) and (-x,-y) differ in angles by 180 degrees.

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1  
note: just realized my 3rd eqn is what @aib said. –  Jason S Aug 21 '09 at 19:15

Solution using Modulo

A simple solution that catches all cases.

degrees = (degrees + 360) % 360;

Explanation

Positive: 0 to 180

If you add 360 to a positive number between 0 and 180, then mod it by 360, you will get the exact same number you put in. Mod here just ensures these positive numbers are returned as the same value.

Negative: -180 to 0

If you add 360 to a negative number between -180 and 0, you'll get a range of values between 180 and 360 degrees.

Zero: 0

If you add 360 to 0, you get 360. Using mod means that 0 is returned again, making this a safe 0-359 degrees solution.

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@Jason S: your "fmod" variant will not work on a standards-compliant implementation. The C standard is explicit and clear (7.12.10.1, "the fmod functions"):

if y is nonzero, the result has the same sign as x

thus,

fmod(atan2(y,x)/M_PI*180,360)

is actually just a verbose rewriting of:

atan2(y,x)/M_PI*180

Your third suggestion, however, is spot on.

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I have 2 solutions that seem to work for all combinations of positive and negative x and y.

1) Abuse atan2()

According to the docs atan2 takes parameters y and x in that order. However if you reverse them you can do the following:

double radians = std::atan2(x, y);
double degrees = radians * 180 / M_PI;
if (radians < 0)
{
    degrees += 360; 
}

2) Use atan2() correctly and convert afterwards

double degrees = std::atan2(y, x) * 180 / M_PI;
if (degrees > 90)
{
    degrees = 450 - degrees;
}
else
{
    degrees = 90 - degrees;
}
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angle = Math.atan2(x,y)*180/Math.PI;

I have made a Formula for orienting angle into 0 to 360

angle + Math.ceil( -angle / 360 ) * 360;
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