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I try to learn pipeline in c language on linux . I write follow program. Are there any error in this program?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>


int main (void)
{
    int fd[2], nbytes;
    pid_t childpid;
    char string[]= "Hello, World!\n";
    char readbuffer[80];


    pipe(fd);

    if((childpid = fork()) == -1)
    {
        perror("fork");
        exit(0);    
    } 

    if(childpid == 0)
    {
        // child process closes up input side of pipe.
        close(fd[0]);

        // send "string" through the output side of pipe.
        write(fd[1], string, strlen(string));
        exit(0);
    }

    else
    {
        // parent process closes up output side of pipe.
        close(fd[0]);

        // Read in a string from pipe.
        nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
        printf("Received string = %s\n", readbuffer);
    }

    return 0;
}

Is there any problem?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Suhail Patel, interjay, Henning Makholm, David Grayson, Julius Oct 29 '12 at 10:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Hi, if the system tells you your post doesn't have enough context, don't just copy-paste that message, add more context. Does your code work? Does it do what you want? If so, this post is off-topic here. If not, what are the problems? Errors? Unexpected output? – Mat Oct 28 '12 at 17:13
    
write(fd[1], string, 1+strlen(string)); – wildplasser Oct 28 '12 at 17:19
    
@wildplasser: only if he wants the '\0' to go down the pipe. More significantly, it should print: printf("Received string = %.*s\n", nbytes, readbuffer); to only print the data that was read. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 17:36
    
@JonathanLeffler: I know that; I was only hinting the OP in the right direction. Trusting on buffers to contain terminating NUL's is waiting for disasters to happen. Your solution is cleaner, of course. (BTW what does printf do when nbytes < 0 ? Ignored? assumed 0? Implementation dependant? ) – wildplasser Oct 28 '12 at 17:42
    
@wildplasser: For nbytes < 0, you probably get into undefined behaviour — a point covered in my answer by avoiding that printf() with a negative length. I chose to avoid a zero length too, even though that is fully defined behaviour, AFAIK. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 17:44

One of these two segments of code is incorrect, simply based on the comments:

if (childpid == 0)
{
    // child process closes up input side of pipe.
    close(fd[0]);

and:

else
{
    // parent process closes up output side of pipe.
    close(fd[0]);

You actually need to close fd[1] in the parent (the writing end). Surprisingly, your read call is correct, but is reading from the file descriptor you just closed in the original.

Note that you should only print what you read (and only if you read something successfully):

if (nbytes > 0)
    printf("Received string: <<%.*s>>\n", nbytes, readbuffer);
else if (nbytes == 0)
    printf("Received no data\n");
else
    printf("Received error (%d: %s)\n", errno, strerror(errno));

(Note that you'd need both <errno.h> and <string.h> for the last line to compile correctly.)

The << and >> markers are there simply so you can see trailing blanks, etc. You can omit them if you prefer.

share|improve this answer
    
Dont forget if (nbytes > 0) { readbuffer[nbytes] = 0; printf("Received string: <<%s>>\n", nbytes, readbuffer);} (or the asterix, off course...) – wildplasser Oct 28 '12 at 17:44
    
The null termination is not needed; the .* was missing. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 17:50

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