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What is a full specification of X-Forwarded-Proto HTTP header values?

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Related: Custom HTTP headers : naming conventions –  BalusC Oct 30 '12 at 15:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

There is no "full specification" -- it's a de facto standard. The X- in front of a header name customarily* has denoted it as experimental/non-standard/vendor-specific. Once it's a standard part of HTTP, it'll lose the prefix.

There's some work from the IETF on standardizing it, but it's just at the draft stages, as far as i can tell. Check out http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-appsawg-http-forwarded-10 for the latest draft as of the time of this writing. But be aware that it can change at any time while it's being fleshed out, and don't rely on it in production stuff yet.

Update:

RFC 7239 now defines the Forwarded: header, which is intended to replace X-Forwarded-*. If you care about standards, i would recommend using that instead.


* This used to be an official thing, but no longer is. RFC 6648 deprecates the x- prefixing convention. Unfortunately, the convention is so widely known (and the deprecation so low-key) that most people outside the IETF will probably ignore the recommendation.

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That's misleading. The "X-" prefix isn't special in HTTP header fields. The Internet Draft that you mentioned defines a new header field called "Forwarded", which is meant to replace the "X-Forwarded-*" header fields found in the wild. Also, it has already been approved for publication, so I wouldn't expect any more changes to it. –  Julian Reschke Oct 29 '12 at 9:29
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It was published as an Internet-Draft. By definition, and as stated in its own prologue, it should only be considered "work in progress". Rely on it at your own peril; it already has changed, 13 times so far. Each change gets published just the same. And say what you like about "X-", but it is a known convention and has been for quite a while. An RFC does not unwrite 15+ years of history, much as the IETF might wish it did. :) –  cHao Oct 29 '12 at 20:00
    
cHao see datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-ietf-appsawg-http-forwarded for the state of the draft - so the draft has been approved by the IESG and is not supposed to change anymore except for editorial fixes and reformatting. If you want to nitpick, I suggest you consult the IETF standards process documentation. –  Julian Reschke Oct 30 '12 at 9:37
    
cHao with respect to "X-": (1) It is defined for some protocol parameters, but is not for header fields. (2) There is no general rule for "unprefixing"; usually, once something is deployed a lot, it's very hard to change. –  Julian Reschke Oct 30 '12 at 10:06
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RFC 7239, june 2014 tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7239 . They settled on Forwarded: proto=https. Let's see how vendor adoption goes. –  mmoya Aug 6 '14 at 14:18

There finally is RFC 7239 - Forwarded HTTP Extension from june 2014. The header is defined in section 5.4.

Some examples:

Forwarded: proto=https
Forwarded: for=1.2.3.4;proto=http

I just hope this won't take too much time to get widely adopted. An example of the diversity of headers because of standard lacking can be seen in this question.

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That's going to take ages before it gets adopted. There are tons of servers that would need updating to parse the new HTTP header. I'm not really on keen updating libraries, frameworks, servers... etc etc. –  CMCDragonkai Apr 19 at 13:09

I'm not aware of a "full specification".

The IETF APPSArea Working Group recently decided to define a new header field "Forwarded" which is supposed to replace the "X-Forwarded-*" header fields that you mentioned.

See http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-appsawg-http-forwarded for details.

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