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Lets see a basic class:

class A
{
   public function renderSomethingRecursive()
   {
      //this function can call itself
      self::renderSomethingRecursive(); // ERROR!!!!
   }

   abstract public function addSomething (value);
}

class B extends A
{
   public function renderSomethingRecursive()
   {
      throw new Exception ('This time this method must not be called!');
   }

   public function addSomething (value)
   {
      //something, something, something....
      parent::renderSomethingRecursive();
   }
}

$obj = new B();
$obj->addSomething(....);

when I do this, B::renderSomethingRecursive() still gets called, which I dont want... on A:renderSomethingRecursive() method, at self::renderSomethingRecursive(); // ERROR!!!! line calls B::renderSomethingRecursive(); instead of A::renderSomethingRecursive();, which is reasonable since $this is now B and not A... but then I have no idea how to dodge it.

Btw, I know B::renderSomethingRecursive() method should just be removed, but I wanted to keep it as a notice that it mustnt be called by accident. I wanted to make it "private" to make this unavailable, but as we know, its not possible :)

Any ideas?

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closed as not a real question by hakre, Gordon, PeeHaa, vascowhite, tereško Oct 28 '12 at 21:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Could not reproduce — your code never invokes B::renderSomethingRecursive() (I have only modified it enough to get it running, i.e. removed value, declared A as abstract, etc). –  lanzz Oct 28 '12 at 17:32
1  
I can not reproduce either. What is your question? –  hakre Oct 28 '12 at 17:50
2  
Please post actual code, this one does not run because of syntax errors. It should never run method from B, so you are obviously doing something wrong, but not showing it withe this code. –  dev-null-dweller Oct 28 '12 at 18:33
1  
codepad.org/vkSnompA –  hakre Oct 28 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why have you defined the method in B if you don't want it to be called. Just don't define it, and there's only 1 method PHP can call. That way, you don't have to use parent::theMethod, you can easily just call it using this->theMethod();

Abstract class A
{
   public function renderSomethingRecursive()
   {
      $this->renderSomethingRecursive(); // no need for self::, that's for static calls
   }

   abstract public function addSomething (value);
}

class B extends A
{
   public function addSomething (value)
   {
      $this->renderSomethingRecursive();//calls the abstract method as though it were defined in class B
   }
}

that's all, really

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Why not refactor to favor composition rather than inheritance? If you start to split up the 'adding something' and 'recursive something' into separate concerns you will find yourself with smaller, easier to understand classes that work together really well together.

Since you don't want callers of B to be able to call renderSomethingRecursive() then remove the function entirely from the class. Also break the inheritance, B does not need to inherit from A. We still want B to be able to 'add stuff' so it'll keep a function called addSomething(). Since we don't want to duplicate the body of addSomething in both classes we can just get B to delegate to an instance of A whenever B::addSomething is called.

abstract class A
{
   public function renderSomethingRecursive()
   {
      // this function can call itself
      self::renderSomethingRecursive();
   }

   abstract function addSomething ($value) {

}

class AA extends A
{
   public function addSomething($value)
   {
      // something, something, something....
      self::renderSomethingRecursive();
   }
}


class B
{
   private $a;
   public function __construct(A $a)
   {
      $this->a = $a;
   }

   public function addSomething ($value) {
      $this->a->addSomething($value);
   }
}

$obj = new B(new AA());
$obj->addSomething(....);

This is getting better already, but we can get rid of this duplicate addSomething before we're done. Rendering and managing lists are really two different concerns, so lets split that up. First we'll move addSomething into B. Then we realize renderSomethingRecursive probably needs access to the $data too, we can add some paramaters so it can get access to that data again. A doesn't need to be abstract anymore, but B might be if there are still different implementations of addSomething. You should be left with something like this...

class A
{
   public function renderSomethingRecursive($data)
   {
      // this function can call itself
      self::renderSomethingRecursive($data);
   }     
}

class B
{
   private $a;
   private $data;
   public function __construct(A $a)
   {
      $this->a = $a;
   }

   public function addSomething ($value) {
      // something, something, something....
      // append to $this->data probably
      $this->a->renderSomethingRecursive($this->data);
   }
}

$obj = new B(new AA());
$obj->addSomething(....);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not why we started to use OO languages at all. The point was to avoid these kind of constructs whenever possible, besides, A is an abstract class, which cannot be instantiated. Also remember that an object that is a property of another object does not have access to that object's methods and vice versa (no protected access).Lastly: if you're going to create a method, best use type hinting: public function __construct(A $a) to avoid the wrong object from being passed to the constructor –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 28 '12 at 18:06
1  
Elias, you're right about omitting the type hinting in the constructor, I'll update my example to include that. I disagree though about avoiding these kinds of constructs, it's my belief that too many programmers who do OOP focus too much on extensibility and not enough of composition; which is the main difference between our two solutions. –  Ryan953 Oct 28 '12 at 18:12
    
I was about to modify my code... I start it again, with a fully not working code –  John Smith Oct 28 '12 at 22:29

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