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I have the following Python 3.2 script:

f = open('C:/foo/bar/baz/text.txt')  

this causes a file not found exception:

ileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'C:/foo/bar/baz/text.txt'

However taking that same path and pasting it into Windows explorer opens the file just fine. What am I missing within my environment on Windows 7?

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It's worth noting you should always use the with statement when dealing with files to ensure they are closed properly (even on exceptions). –  Lattyware Oct 28 '12 at 17:41
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Turns out it was text.txt.txt –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 17:47
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4 Answers

In windows you should try something like:

f = open(r'C:\foo\bar\baz\text.txt')
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This works on my Windows 7 professional, but fails on Windows 7 Home –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 17:36
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Forward slashes should work perfectly well under windows. –  Lattyware Oct 28 '12 at 17:36
    
@Lattyware can't even test, I am on ubuntu. –  undefined is not a function Oct 28 '12 at 17:37
    
@Woot4Moo are you sure do you've the exact path in your win7 home? –  undefined is not a function Oct 28 '12 at 17:38
    
yes it opens up directly in windows explorer. –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 17:39
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Make sure 'C:\foo\bar\baz\text.txt' exists

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It does, please read the question I posted. –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 17:44
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You should use double backslash in the path instead of slash.

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also fails, i think the double slash only applies to forward. –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 17:33
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The single forward slash should work fine, and @Woot4Moo no, you escape backslashes in the path, not forward. It's either C:/folder/file or C:\\folder\\file –  jsvk Oct 28 '12 at 18:30
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I realized the issue after running icacls on the command line:

The file that icacls finds was actually text.txt.txt . The odd part was that windows was still able to find it.

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You have 'show file extensions' turned off. Windows still detects that this file exists because you have this option enabled. You did NOT 'make sure the file exists' as you said, nor did 'text.txt' actually exist as you claimed –  jsvk Oct 28 '12 at 17:55
    
@jsvk Incorrect the file showed up in explorer, I have been programming long enough to validate that a file does indeed exist before coming to SO. However, when the file is displayed via explorer it implies the file is there. –  Woot4Moo Oct 28 '12 at 18:07
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But you didn't verify it exists. Explorer displays 'text.txt' instead of 'text.txt.txt' because you have file extensions hidden, an aesthetic feature present on later versions of windows. The file listed was not text.txt, even if it displays in explorer that way. You'll notice other files, like "setup.exe", may display as "setup". That doesn't mean the filename is "setup" –  jsvk Oct 28 '12 at 18:17
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It's an understandable mistake, however, I don't think this question is really useful to anyone any more, you might want to delete it. –  Lattyware Oct 28 '12 at 18:23
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