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I have a Student class that has to have a property of a String ID, which has to be validated. I'm not sure whether to validate it inside the student class or the class that I'm implementing the Student class in. Does that make sense?

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2  
validated how exactly? –  Hunter McMillen Oct 28 '12 at 17:42
    
The ID is a String in the format of GXXXXXXXX, where the G is literal and the X's are digits –  George K. Oct 28 '12 at 17:43
2  
You validate the string wherever the "contract" between the various modules implies it should be validated. The most obvious place is the Student constructor, but you may, eg, want to validate the number dynamically as it's typed and give real-time feedback, or disable the "save" button (and present a "Please enter..." message) until a valid value is entered. –  Hot Licks Oct 28 '12 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming ID is final and immutable, then one approach is to have Student constructor throw an exception, probably new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid student ID");

You may additionally provide static method in Student class, which verifies if string is valid, in case you need to check it without creating Student object.

But the logic of determining if ID is valid or not should be in the Student class, I think.

If there are (or can be in future) different kind of student IDs, you could also consider abstract factory pattern, but sounds like that is bit of an overkill.

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You say, "additionally provide a static method" - do you mean that I can validate it right in the constructor? –  George K. Oct 28 '12 at 17:48
    
@hyde you may also check in setter class. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Oct 28 '12 at 17:49
1  
This approach could not be used anywhere, for instance in MVC framework which create empty instance to be filled with parameters from the form. –  Kartoch Oct 28 '12 at 17:50
1  
Allowing student id to be mutable sounds like recipe for all kinds of potential errors, for example when using collections. –  hyde Oct 28 '12 at 17:55

If Student already has any business inside use validate inside else use second one

Class Student
{
 public boolean  validate ()
  {
   //some logic to validation
  }
}

Inside of Model or controller or Action

 public boolean  validate ()
  {
   //some logic to validation
  }
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Some frameworks prefer to delegate the validation task outside the object or controller(s). See for instance how validator works in Spring Framework. –  Kartoch Oct 28 '12 at 17:51
    
Kartoch Thank you.but in this case there is no web application so this also can be possible choice. –  sunleo Oct 28 '12 at 17:55
    
About combing validation ? Or validate against a database ? Please see my post for more explanation... –  Kartoch Oct 28 '12 at 18:09

One of the approach is to use validation object. For instance see the Validation approach uses in the Spring Framework. You create an object which implements the interface Validator with two methods: one to detect if the Validator can validate the instance to validate, and another one which validate it.

public class StudentValidator implements Validator<Student> {

  public boolean supports(Student student) {
   // ...
  }

  public void validate(Object target, Errors errors) {
   // ...
  }
}

This approach leads to separation of the code of the object and the way to validate it, offering more flexibility when combining validator:

  • you can combine several Validator even if the class hierarchy is not respected (POJO principle).
  • when you need to validate field with data from other system (for instance a database), this approach avoid to mix database / persistence code in the POJO domain class.

Please see the documentation of Spring about Validation.

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your approach is good. Thank you for your guidance. –  sunleo Oct 28 '12 at 18:12

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