Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a simple function to extract the next number from an expression in a string and my problem is that the reference parameter ioIsValidExpression is not being updated after the function exits. It looks like I am actually referencing the correct variable (and not a temporary) since the addresses of test3 (as it is called before calling getNextNumber(...)) and ioIsValidExpression (its name when inside the function) are the same.

I expect this to be an embarassing mistake somewhere but I'm getting nowhere trying to figure this one out; I've included my int main and int getNextNumber with a comment line where I return a value from the function.

int getNextNumber(std::string& iExpression, int& ioLoopShift, bool& ioIsValidExpression)
{
    //spaces are ignored, a minus is a unary minus (so must be seated next to a number (no spaces between '-' and number))
    int length = iExpression.size(); //evaluate only once
    bool unaryMinusFound = false;
    bool numberFound = false;

    int oSubExpression = 0;
    for(int i =0; i < length; i++)
    {
        if((int)iExpression[i] == 32)
        {
            if(!numberFound)
            {
                if(!unaryMinusFound)
                {
                    continue;
                }
                else
                {
                    ioIsValidExpression = false;
                    td::cout << "address of ioIsValidExpression: " << &ioIsValidExpression << ", value: " << ioIsValidExpression << "\n";
                    return 0;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                return unaryMinusFound? -1 * oSubExpression: oSubExpression;
            }
        }
        if((int)iExpression[i] == 45 && !unaryMinusFound)
        {
            unaryMinusFound = true;
            continue;
        }
        if((int)iExpression[i] >= 48 && (int)iExpression[i] <= 57)
        {
            numberFound = true;
            oSubExpression = (int)(iExpression[i]-48) + 10*oSubExpression;
            ioLoopShift++;
            continue;
        }
        else
        {
            //garbage characters
            ioIsValidExpression = false;
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return unaryMinusFound? -1 * oSubExpression: oSubExpression;
}

int main:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::string test = " - 45 & ";
    int test2 = 0;
    bool test3 = true;
    std::cout << getNextNumber(test,test2,test3) << ", address of test3: " << &test3 << ", value: " << test3 << "\n";

    return 0;
}

output from running the program:

address of ioIsValidExpression: 0xbf86e58f, value: 0
0, address of test3: 0xbf86e58f, value: 1
share|improve this question
1  
It's unspecified what order the outputs are evaluated in. Your bool is being evaluated to true before the function changes it to false. Also, prefer '0' to 48, as it isn't always 48. –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 18:05
    
Consider the case of stream manipulators with std::cout ... you can't have the manipulator being evaluated on std::cout before other elements in the sequence of operator>> calls ... that would completely mess up the output. –  Jason Oct 28 '12 at 18:14
    
@Jason, It still does the output in order, but the arguments can be evaluated in whatever order it pleases. It uses the result of one operator<< as an argument to another. The innermost call is outputted first, but by that time, the outermost argument could have been evaluated to true. –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 18:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The order in which function arguments (and your output statement is a chain of functions) are evaluated is unspecified. Consider how it works correctly upon holding the result of the function in a variable before outputting the whole thing: test

int temp = getNextNumber(test, test2, test3);
std::cout << temp << ", address of test3: " << &test3 << ", value: " << test3 << "\n";

Output:

address of ioIsValidExpression: 0xbfaa85cf, value: 0
0, address of test3: 0xbfaa85cf, value: 0

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't cdecl calling convention create some type of ordering? For the overloaded operator>> there are two arguments. There is no sequence point for the ordering of the evaluation of those two arguments, but it does mean that either the first argument is initially evaluated, modifying test3 before it can be evaluated, or test3 is evaluate first, and then the nested function calls that comprise the first argument to the outer-most function call are not reflected in that evaluation. I think that can be the only ambiguous ordering. –  Jason Oct 28 '12 at 18:55
    
Thanks for that, it makes sense now it has been pointed out to me...this one was driving me crazy and is not a mistake I want to make again! –  HexedAgain Oct 28 '12 at 18:58
    
It only defines the ordering of the parameters on the stack. The compiler is still free to compute their values in any order, as long as it pushes them in that order. Plus, the Standard does not deal in calling conventions in this manner. –  Puppy Oct 28 '12 at 19:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.