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I’m using Dependency Injection to mock out classes in order to unit test other classes that depend on them:

class Foo : IFoo
{
    // production code
}

class MockFoo : IFoo
{
    // mock so other classes that depend on Foo can be unit tested
}

class Bar
{
    public DoSomething()
    {
        var barValue = 20;
        // use dependency injection to get Foo instance.
        DependencyInjection.Instance.Foo.ExampleMethod(barValue);
    }
}

However, setting up my dependency injection class is getting unwieldy, labyrinthine and complicated:

public class DependencyInjection
{
    public Setup()
    {
        this.Foo = new Foo();
        this.Bar = new Bar("example constructor string");
        this.Bat = new Bat(123,234);
        // for every single class in my application!
    }
}

(simplified for clarity, but you can imagine the real implementation with dozens of classes and their constructors).

There are also a number of other problems:

  • DependencyInjection and each of its class instances are a huge global variable passed around my application.
  • I’m initializing all of my classes at the same time.
  • I have to provide an interface for every class I write for unit testing – I’m allowing unit testing to dictate the design of my program (most of the classes I write would be concrete implementations with no interface if it weren’t for this constraint).

Advice on how to solve these problems would be appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

Let me try answering your bullet points:

Dependency injections is a concept. You don't need to create a class for it. I suggest to design your classes for constructor injection. If you want to use a DI framework or implement your own, the usual pattern is to have a two step API: register your dependencies and resolve them at application start-up (or better explained by Groo at composition roots).

It is the usual case for dependency injection to initialise classes at start up. But you can define life-cycles or use factories if your object lifetime is different.

When unit testing, you shouldn't need to define an interface for your class but only for it's dependencies. That is one of the biggest benefits of this approach. While writing your class to depend only on interfaces, you can create test doubles (mocks, stubs etc.) for these dependencies very easily. There are lot's of frameworks for this too, but again you are free to use your own test implementations of these interfaces.

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What you do is a Service Locator (anti) pattern. It provides hidden dependency injection (it's not clear what dependencies required for your class). What you need is method call injection, which will make your dependencies explicit and easy-mocked:

class Bar
{
    public DoSomething(IFoo foo)
    {
        var barValue = 20;
        // use dependency injection to get Foo instance.       
    }
}

Another types of dependency injection is constructor injection (when IFoo dependency provided via constructor parameter) and property injection (dependency provided via public property).

Now it's clear from API that Bar needs IFoo dependency to complete it's work. And you can easily mock this dependency (sample with Moq):

Mock<IFoo> fooMock = new Mock<IFoo>();
// setup mock
Bar bar = new Bar();
bar.DoSomething(fooMock.Object);

How to inject IFoo implementation at runtime? You can use some dependency injection framework like Ninject.

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Using DI doesn't mean that you should suddenly stop decoupling your code. By no means should you use global variables to pass your implementations around.

When you are creating a class which needs to solve a certain part of functionality, you should pass all "external" dependencies through the constructor:

class Bar
{
    private readonly IFoo _foo;
    public Bar(IFoo foo)
    {
        _foo = foo;
    }

    public DoSomething()
    {
        _foo.ExampleMethod(20)
    }
}

Best practice with DI is to use it at the beginning (composition root) of your application to get external implementations, and then pass implementations around as you would do without DI.

The bottom line is: you don't need to inject IFoo in order to test Bar - simply mock it in your test method, and you're done. Use DI only for important blocks of your app, which you want configurable (like choosing a concrete data layer, for example).

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For unit testing, I generally override the constructor to take in an instance of the dependency. This way, my unit test can create the mock object and pass it in.

private IFoo foo;

public Bar()
{
    // Production code uses the real thing
    this.foo = new Foo();
}

public Bar(IFoo foo)
{
    // Test code uses a passed-in object, likely a mock
    this.foo = foo;
}

public DoSomething()
{
    foo.DoSomething();
}
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