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I use grep to return unmatched array between temporaryF file and arrayWarning

my @c =grep!${{map{$_,1}@temporaryF}{$_},@arrayWarning;

Inside @c there are alot of lines for example:

Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:06:55 fibre channel ROOT cause
Sun Sep 30 00:08:55 fibre channel ROOT cause 
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:20:55 fibre channel DANN 
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN  

as you can see ROOT occurs 3 times in @c. How can I iterate through @c to output only the latest occurrence of ROOT -> Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT and not the other repeated lines.

so it will become:

Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever  
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Note: this is an extension of the answer of @RobEarl - so if you like it, please make sure to give him credits, too!

The point here is to store the line count too, to make sure the output can be ordered.

Long version

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# store (with count)
my $count  = 0;
my %latest = map {
    my $source = (split /\s+/ => $_)[6];
    $source => {count => $count++, string => $_};
} <DATA>;

# output
print $_->{string} for sort {$a->{count} <=> $b->{count}} values %latest;

__DATA__
Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:06:55 fibre channel ROOT cause
Sun Sep 30 00:08:55 fibre channel ROOT cause 
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:20:55 fibre channel DANN 
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN  

Output:

Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN  

Feels a little bit like the Schwartzian transform.

One-liner version

This is an excellent example for a task that can be accomplished by a simple oneliner with perl's powerful interpreter switches:

$ perl -nale '$l{$F[6]}={c=>$c++,s=>$_};END{print$_->{s}for sort{$a->{c}<=>$b->{c}}values%l}'
Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:06:55 fibre channel ROOT cause
Sun Sep 30 00:08:55 fibre channel ROOT cause 
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:20:55 fibre channel DANN 
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN  

Output:

Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause  
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN  
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, could you please post some information about that __XYZ__ language construct you used in your code? Does it have some name so I could search it? I've never seen it before. – duri Oct 28 '12 at 21:04
    
Hi @duri, I'm not sure if this is the best perldoc to start with, but I found something about it in perldata. It was just a handy way to store both the program and its input data in one script file. :) – memowe Oct 28 '12 at 21:07
    
Thank you. Sorry for the offtopic. – duri Oct 28 '12 at 21:08
    
thank you this works only if the warning words are after (split /\s+/ => $_)[6]; But how to change it to substr($_,20)? I couldnt seem to work this in your coding. – momokjaaaaa Oct 30 '12 at 7:02
    
the error i got is "useless use of string in void context" – momokjaaaaa Oct 30 '12 at 7:45

Use a hash with ROOT/DENY/DANN as the key:

my %latest = map { (split(" "))[6] => $_ } @c;

Assuming @c is ordered by date, values %latest will contain:

Sun Sep 30 00:10:55 fibre channel ROOT cause
Sun Sep 30 00:05:55 fibre channel DENY forever
Sun Sep 30 00:30:55 fibre channel DANN
share|improve this answer
    
The ordering of @c has no (defined) influence on the order of values %latest because hashes aren't ordered. – memowe Oct 28 '12 at 20:26
    
@memowe no but it does influence the content – RobEarl Oct 28 '12 at 20:29
    
Nevermind, you're right, that only the "latest" occurence of ROOT for example will survive. However, the values list isn't ordered by date as one might assume. – memowe Oct 28 '12 at 20:32
    
I added an extension of this answer with sortable output. – memowe Oct 28 '12 at 21:04
    
@memowe, looks good. I was thinking of getting the order from @c (grep at the end) but preserving it through the hash probably makes more sense. – RobEarl Oct 28 '12 at 22:20

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