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I'm learning Unix, and I want to sort this table:

Name:Alice,ID:2368,Hometown:columbus,bithday:03/11/1988
Name:Ted,ID:2368,Hometown:Portland,bithday:06-11-1992
Name:Mark,ID:2218,Hometown:Palo Alto,bithday:04-23-1984
Name:Xiao,ID:2571,hometown:Carson,bithday:07/06/1975
Name:Rain,ID:0264,hometown:little stone,bithday:11-09-1982
Name:Susan,ID:1261,Hometown:Menlo park,bithday:12-13-1989
Name:Zack,ID:1594,Hometown:columbus,bithday:02-04-1984

And have it formatted like this:

Rain,0264,little stone,11-09-1982
Susan,1261,Menlo park,12-13-1989
Zack,1594,columbus,02-04-1984
Mark,2218,Palo Alto,04-23-1984
Alice,2368,columbus,03-11-1988
Ted,2368,Portland,06-11-1992
Xiao,2571,Carson,07-06-1975

I want to filter out the key in the key-value pairs (key:value) and then sort by ID using using awk and sort.

What commands would I use to do this?

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You haven't picked an answer, so the answers that have been provided obviously aren't working for you. Can you describe what hasn't been covered? – Graham Nov 27 '12 at 20:16

Its as simple as this:

awk -F: '{gsub(/,[^:]*:/,",");print $2}' You_file| sort -t, -k 2,2n

tested below:

> cat temp
Name:Alice,ID:2368,Hometown:columbus,bithday:03/11/1988
Name:Ted,ID:2368,Hometown:Portland,bithday:06-11-1992
Name:Mark,ID:2218,Hometown:Palo Alto,bithday:04-23-1984
Name:Xiao,ID:2571,hometown:Carson,bithday:07/06/1975
Name:Rain,ID:0264,hometown:little stone,bithday:11-09-1982
Name:Susan,ID:1261,Hometown:Menlo park,bithday:12-13-1989
Name:Zack,ID:1594,Hometown:columbus,bithday:02-04-1984
>

Now the execution:

> awk -F: '{gsub(/,[^:]*:/,",");print $2}' temp | sort -t, -k 2,2n
Rain,0264,little stone,11-09-1982
Susan,1261,Menlo park,12-13-1989
Zack,1594,columbus,02-04-1984
Mark,2218,Palo Alto,04-23-1984
Alice,2368,columbus,03/11/1988
Ted,2368,Portland,06-11-1992
Xiao,2571,Carson,07/06/1975
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Care to explain how is this better than @Aif's answer? – LIttle Ancient Forest Kami Oct 29 '12 at 10:48
    
+1 for the -t argument for sort that I didn't know :-) – Aif Oct 29 '12 at 14:28
1  
Well aifs answer has 3 pipes and four different commands and too much code.but here it has only one pipe and two commands – Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 16:08

This took me a while to figure out, until I finally saw that "birthday" was mis-spelled in your input data.

You could go whole-hog with this and parse the data as actual data:

awk -F, '
  BEGIN {
    fmt="%s,%s,%s,%s\n";
  }

  {
    for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {           # walk through the fields...
      split($i,a,":");              # split each one at the colon, save to array
      v[tolower(a[1])]=a[2];        # need tolower() as "Hometown" is inconsistent
    }
    split(v["bithday"],b,/[-\/]/);  # regex here handles your inconsistent divider
    v["bithday"]=sprintf("%s-%s-%s",b[3],b[2],b[1]);
    printf(fmt,v["name"],v["id"],v["hometown"],v["bithday"]);
  }
' input.txt | sort -t, -k2

This goes through each line, breaks up the fields by comma, stores the key=value combinations in an array, adjusts your "bithday" format and prints. (Note that I've picked a more sensible date format for you.)

But it might just be easier to do some simple pattern matching:

sed -Ene 's/^[[:alpha:]]+://;s/,[[:alpha:]]+:/,/g;s/([0-9]{2}).([0-9]{2}).([0-9]{4})$/\3-\2-\1/;p' input.txt \
| sort -t, -k2

This produces the same results, but with less code. If you need to do more interesting things with your input data, then of course, awk is the way to go.

Oh, and my sed comes from FreeBSD, so it uses the -E option to get ERE. If you're using Linux or some other provider of GNU sed, you can probably replace the -E with -r.

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Using grep to find the value, paste to reassemble the lines, and of course sort:

grep -oP '(?<=:).*?(,|$)' filename | paste -d "" - - - - | sort -n -t, -k2

Assuming no commas in the values.

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The simplest way I found is to use awk to reformat the output, and append a new column that sort will use, and use awk again to hide that column.

$ cat test.dat
Name:Alice,ID:2368,Hometown:columbus,bithday:03/11/1988
Name:Ted,ID:2368,Hometown:Portland,bithday:06-11-1992
Name:Mark,ID:2218,Hometown:Palo Alto,bithday:04-23-1984
Name:Xiao,ID:2571,hometown:Carson,bithday:07/06/1975
Name:Rain,ID:0264,hometown:little stone,bithday:11-09-1982
Name:Susan,ID:1261,Hometown:Menlo park,bithday:12-13-1989
Name:Zack,ID:1594,Hometown:columbus,bithday:02-04-1984

$ cat test.dat| awk -F, '{ gsub(/[a-zA-Z]+:/, ""); print $2,$0; }' | sort | awk '{ $1=""; print; }'
 Rain,0264,little stone,11-09-1982
 Susan,1261,Menlo park,12-13-1989
 Zack,1594,columbus,02-04-1984
 Mark,2218,Palo Alto,04-23-1984
 Alice,2368,columbus,03/11/1988
 Ted,2368,Portland,06-11-1992
 Xiao,2571,Carson,07/06/1975

The -F is to specify the delimiter (here ,). We then want to delete the column name (ie any letter followed by :), and finally display the ID column, and the whole rewritten line. We then use sort, which by default assumes that the sorting key is the first column, and awk again to display only the second part of each line.

Edit: given the spaces in the cities, there was an output issue with awk. For the sake of simplicity, I just re-assigned the first variable (which is the column you want hidden) and print the whole line.

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Here's one way using GNU awk:

awk 'BEGIN { FS="[,:]"; OFS="," } { for (i=2; i<=NF; i+=2) printf (i!=NF) ? $i OFS : $i ORS | "sort -t, -nk2" }' file.txt

Results:

Rain,0264,little stone,11-09-1982
Susan,1261,Menlo park,12-13-1989
Zack,1594,columbus,02-04-1984
Mark,2218,Palo Alto,04-23-1984
Alice,2368,columbus,03/11/1988
Ted,2368,Portland,06-11-1992
Xiao,2571,Carson,07/06/1975
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Must there be awk? If not:

  1. use Vim to remove key strings with :%s/[a-z]*://gi
  2. Use sort to sort: sort -t , -k 2 file

If AWK is a must, then I'd think of this, to sort WITHOUT losing keys - but the answer @Aif gave is nice as well.

EDIT: improved thanks to @Aif's regex and due to @Ghoti's comment. Now Vim command for substitution uses regex and key case and text 'matters not' as master Yoda would say.

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(1) you can make keyname's case NOT matter with the vi command :set ic to IgnoreCase. And (2) this is fine for a one-off, but you can't automate vim commands easily. Finally, (3) your "sorting with awk" link is actually for GAWK, not awk. If the OP doesn't mention his platform, a good answer will be non-denominational and work everywhere, not just on YOUR favourite platform. – ghoti Oct 28 '12 at 21:38
    
Ad Vim command: (1) it's case sensitive, therefore I marked it as such (2) very nice regex in @Aif's answer (first one here) may well be used in it making case sensitivity a moot point. Ad "my link", it covers Gnu Awk and Awk alike, scroll down the page it leads to, to see for yourself: section "Standard awk". I found however GAWK's asorti() to be noteworthy for this case - moreso because Awk answer was already present - anything wrong with it? – LIttle Ancient Forest Kami Oct 29 '12 at 0:30

Just set the FS and OFS to what they are in your head, print the fields you want, and sort:

$ awk -F'[:,]' -v OFS=, '{print $2,$4,$6,$8}' file | sort -t, -k2n
Rain,0264,little stone,11-09-1982
Susan,1261,Menlo park,12-13-1989
Zack,1594,columbus,02-04-1984
Mark,2218,Palo Alto,04-23-1984
Alice,2368,columbus,03/11/1988
Ted,2368,Portland,06-11-1992
Xiao,2571,Carson,07/06/1975
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After you have formatted it as needed (I understand that you have), you can sort by the second column by piping the data to sort -t, -k2.

If you actually haven't yet, I think one of the easiest ways would be sed 's/[[:alnum:]]*://g'.

So the whole command would be

sed 's/[[:alnum:]]*://g' table.csv | sort -t, -k2
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cat temp.txt | awk -F",|:" '{print $2","$4","$6}' | sort -t, -k2n

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Useless use of cat, awk ... temp.txt works just as good and saves a (possibly stalling) pipe. – Markus W Mahlberg Apr 1 '15 at 23:12

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