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I got this strange problem while writing code for an exercise.

First when I pick the first option, enter a faulty entry. It's supposed to go to an else branch of my code but instead it gets stuck in there. I really don't know why. This also happens when I enter a "game title" with a space in between.

Secondly the line I commented out at the delete branch:

iter = gameTitles.erase(iter);

... doesn't work at all. What I'm trying to do is deleting an entry by typing it out and after that comparing it to an entry so it knows what to delete. That's why I'm also using the iterator.

// Exercise 1
/*
Write a program using vectors and iterators that allows a user to maintain a list of
his or her favorite games. The program should allow the user to list all game titles,
add a game title, and remove a game title.
*/

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main(){
    bool    bLoop   = true;
    int     nChoice;
    char    cChoice;
    string  sInput;

    vector<string>::const_iterator iter;
    vector<string> gameTitles;

    while(bLoop){
        // -Head
        cout << "///////////////////////////////////\n// My Favorite Games\n\n";
        cout << "1. Add title\n2. Delete title\n3. Clear list\n\n";

        // -List
        if(!gameTitles.empty()){
            for(iter = gameTitles.begin(); iter!=gameTitles.end(); ++iter){
                cout << "-" << *iter << endl;
            }
        }

        cout << "\n:: ";
        cin  >> nChoice;

        // 1. Add
        if(nChoice == 1){
            cout << "\nGame Title: ";
            cin >> sInput;
            gameTitles.push_back(sInput);
        }

        // 2. Delete
        else if(nChoice == 2) {
            cout << "Delete Title: ";
            cin >> sInput;

            for(iter = gameTitles.begin(); iter!=gameTitles.end(); ++iter){
                if(*iter == sInput){
                    cout << "erased";
                    //iter = gameTitles.erase(iter);
                }
            }
        }

        // 3. Clear
        else if(nChoice == 3){
            cout << "Are you sure? (y/n) ";
            cin >> cChoice;
            if(cChoice == 'y'){
                gameTitles.clear();
            }
        } else {
            cout << "\nInvalid Choice, Please try again.\n";
        }

        // -Clean
        system("PAUSE");
        system("cls");
    }
}

EDIT: Solved first issue. Used a normal iterator instead of a constant one

EDIT2: Solved second issue, here is my corrected code:

// Exercise 1
/*
Write a program using vectors and iterators that allows a user to maintain a list of
his or her favorite games. The program should allow the user to list all game titles,
add a game title, and remove a game title.
*/

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main(){
    bool    bLoop   = true;
    int     nChoice;
    char    cChoice;
    string  sInput;

    vector<string>::iterator iter;
    vector<string> gameTitles;

    while(bLoop){
        // -Head
        cout << "///////////////////////////////////\n// My Favorite Games\n\n";
        cout << "1. Add title\n2. Delete title\n3. Clear list\n\n";

        // -List
        if(!gameTitles.empty()){
            for(iter = gameTitles.begin(); iter!=gameTitles.end(); ++iter){
                cout << "-" << *iter << endl;
            }
        }

        cout << "\n:: ";
        cin >> nChoice;

        if(cin.fail()){
            cin.clear();
            cin.ignore();
        }

        // 1. Add
        if(nChoice == 1){
            cout << "\nGame Title: ";
            cin >> sInput;
            gameTitles.push_back(sInput);
        }

        // 2. Delete
        else if(nChoice == 2) {
            cout << "Delete Title: ";
            cin >> sInput;

            for(iter = gameTitles.begin(); iter!=gameTitles.end(); ){
                if(*iter == sInput){
                    cout << "erased";
                    iter = gameTitles.erase(iter);
                } else {
                    ++iter;
                }
            }
        }

        // 3. Clear
        else if(nChoice == 3){
            cout << "Are you sure? (y/n) ";
            cin >> cChoice;
            if(cChoice == 'y'){
                gameTitles.clear();
            }
        } else {
            cout << "\nInvalid Choice, Please try again.\n";
        }

        // -Clean
        system("PAUSE");
        system("cls");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
That empty check around the loop is pointless. –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 20:11
    
@chris What empty check? –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:14
    
Oh yeah that. Well there is no point running the code if there is no content to run it on. –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:15
    
But if it's empty, begin == end, so it's the same anyway. If there is a performance difference, it's miniscule, and it just bloats your code. –  chris Oct 28 '12 at 20:16
    
Alright, you are right but that's not the issue here at the moment. –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are actually two questions:

  1. Why does my input get stuck if enter something faulty? You need to verify that you input was successful using something like if (std::cin >> nChoice) { /* actual processing */ }. Note that the value of nChoice won't change when the input fails. If the input failed, you need to do some error recovery: The stream has gone into fail state (i.e., std::ios_base::failbit is set in the error flags) and won't refuse to do any further input until it got clear()ed. This still leaves the offending character(s) in the input which you may want to ignore().
  2. Why is the loop using erase() misbehaving? When you actually do erase() a value you don't want to increment the iterator again at the end of the loop. If you do, it may very well move the iterator beyond the end resulting in undefined behavior. That is, the loop should look something like this:

    for(iter = gameTitles.begin(); iter!=gameTitles.end(); ) {
        if (*iter == sInput) {
             cout << "erased";
             iter = gameTitles.erase(iter);
        }
        else {
            ++iter;
        }
    }
    

    Of course, a short version of the same logic is this:

    gamesTitles.erase(std::remove(gamesTitles.begin(), games.Titles.end(),
                                  sInput),
                      games.Titles.end());
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply but if you read my edit. You'll see it's already solved. Now I only got to deal with the first one you mentioned, also it was something I assumed that a fail state would've caused it. Only thing is I never encountered such an error so I haven't got any experience with this. I'll try your suggestion right now. –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:20
1  
@JensAckou Actually you still have the problem that Dietmar identified. It just hasn't happened to you yet. Try using your code to delete the last game in the list and see if your code is still working then. Better still re-read Dietmar's answer and understand what he is saying, it is correct. –  john Oct 28 '12 at 20:31
    
U are right. Just a plain crash. Got it fixed now. –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:39
    
@Dietmar Now how would you solve the "int only" input so I don't get this error? –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:42
    
@JensAckou: When input for an int fails, std::cin isn't true because std::ios_base::failbit is set. You would test std::cin before doing the normal processing and otherwise do some level of recovery: std::cin.clear(); to clear std::ios_base::failbit and then, e.g., std::cin.ignore(); to ignore the current character. You might want to ignore everything up to the next newline instead, std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 28 '12 at 23:02

I think you get it wrong, iterator that returned from erase method of a container never point to value that erased from that container, suppose this:

std::vector<std::string> v;
// push some items to v
v.push_back( "1" );
v.push_back( "2" );
v.push_back( "3" );
auto i = v.erase( v.end() - 1 );
// Now i point to end of v and you can't derefrence it

Instead it point to to position in your vector that previously contain your value:

auto i = v.erase( v.begin() );
assert( *i == "2" );
share|improve this answer
    
Well it works now I switched to a normal iterator instead a constant one. –  Jens Ackou Oct 28 '12 at 20:16

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