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Why we use a char array to create a buffer in the memory instead of a int array and if int array can be used to create the buffer,how to get the output from it ?

int main()
{
    char  buffer[100];
    fread(buffer,sizeof(int),4,stdin);
    int i=0;
    while(i<4)
    {
        printf ("%d,\n",buffer[i]);
        i=i+1;
    }    
}
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marked as duplicate by Daniel Fischer, DCoder, Richard J. Ross III, Greg Hewgill, H2CO3 Oct 28 '12 at 20:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
We use char because it's logical. It represents one character (usually) in the ASCII encoding, according to ANSI C. Things get odd if you are dealing with Unicode, however. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 28 '12 at 20:19
1  
@user1781308 - I'm not sure why you're being kicked around so brutally. Sorry :(. A few comments: 1) a char is not an int. But both are integral values. 2) "buffers" are traditionally arrays of byte. But they don't need to be. Your buffer can be double[], some_struct[] or, in your case, int[]. 3) "fread()" can accomodate buffers of different element widths (like int vs. char). low-level "read()" and "write() - or socket reads and writes - expect byte buffers only. 'Hope that helps.. –  paulsm4 Oct 28 '12 at 20:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Very simply: we use a char array if we want to read bytes.

Either text strings, or (more generally), binary objects.

A "byte" is usually 1/4 the size of an "int".

Moreover, socket "read" and "write" counts are byte counts. By longstanding convention, they expect byte buffers.

'Hope that helps!

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what if, i want to use an int array to create the buffer..? –  Shivam Dhabhai Oct 28 '12 at 20:31
    
You can :). Your fread() example does exactly that. See my notes above, however. –  paulsm4 Oct 28 '12 at 20:32
1  
thankyou very much for your help..:) –  Shivam Dhabhai Oct 28 '12 at 20:35

Because char in the C language is exactly 1 byte. So it's logical to write in the file byte by byte.

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Minor correction - there is no requirement for a byte to be 8 bits: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte –  paulsm4 Oct 28 '12 at 20:24

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