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I have two closely related questions:

First, how can the Haskell's Arrow class be modeled / represented in Agda?

 class Arrow a where 
      arr :: (b -> c) -> a b c
      (>>>) :: a b c -> a c d -> a b d
      first :: a b c -> a (b,d) (c,d)
      second :: a b c -> a (d,b) (d,c)
      (***) :: a b c -> a b' c' -> a (b,b') (c,c')
      (&&&) :: a b c -> a b c' -> a b (c,c')

(the following Blog Post states that it should be possible...)

Second, in Haskell, the (->) is a first-class citizen and just another higher-order type and its straightforward to define (->) as one instance of the Arrow class. But how is that in Agda? I could be wrong, but I feel, that Agdas -> is a more integral part of Agda, than Haskell's -> is. So, can Agdas -> be seen as a higher-order type, i.e. a type function yielding Set which can be made an instance of Arrow?

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Interesting question. (In Haskell, Arrows come with some syntactic sugar that make them even more helpful.) –  AndrewC Oct 28 '12 at 20:43
    
@AndrewC: you mean Patterson's proc-Notation? It would be indeed interesting to know, if that would be expressible in Agda, too... –  phynfo Oct 28 '12 at 21:54
    
That's exactly what I mean, yes. –  AndrewC Oct 28 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Type classes are usually encoded as records in Agda, so you can encode the Arrow class as something like this:

open import Data.Product -- for tuples

record Arrow (A : Set → Set → Set) : Set₁ where
  field  
    arr    : ∀ {B C} → (B → C) → A B C
    _>>>_  : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A C D → A B D
    first  : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A (B × D) (C × D)
    second : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A (D × B) (D × C)
    _***_  : ∀ {B C B' C'} → A B C → A B' C' → A (B × B') (C × C')
    _&&&_  : ∀ {B C C'} → A B C → A B C' → A B (C × C')

While you can't refer to the function type directly (something like _→_ is not valid syntax), you can write your own name for it, which you can then use when writing an instance:

_=>_ : Set → Set → Set
A => B = A → B

fnArrow : Arrow _=>_  -- Alternatively: Arrow (λ A B → (A → B)) or even Arrow _
fnArrow = record
  { arr    = λ f → f
  ; _>>>_  = λ g f x → f (g x)
  ; first  = λ { f (x , y) → (f x , y) }
  ; second = λ { f (x , y) → (x , f y) }
  ; _***_  = λ { f g (x , y) → (f x , g y) }
  ; _&&&_  = λ f g x → (f x , g x)
  }
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Oh, its even that easy! I was just thinking towards much more complex approaches ... thanks very much! –  phynfo Oct 28 '12 at 21:57
2  
It's probably also worth mentioning that the Arrow Laws can also be encoded directly in Agda. For example, the Arrow record above may also include a field stating that arr (f >>> g) = arr f >>> arr g (where = is some appropriate equality, e.g. propositional). –  Vespasian Nov 5 '12 at 15:05
    
@hammar: I am right now trying to implement the suggested appraoch and at the moment I dont get it, how to write (with the above record) an overloaded expression like arr f >>> g *** h ? –  phynfo Nov 7 '12 at 15:24
1  
@phynfo: You'll want to familiarize yourself with the records/module system, as it generally involves a bit more manual wiring than in Haskell. The way I usually do it is to add a where open Arrow myInstance, which will bring all the functions into scope for a particular instance. –  hammar Nov 7 '12 at 15:55
1  
@phynfo: Here's how I'd write that example. –  hammar Nov 7 '12 at 16:02

While hammar's answer is a correct port of the Haskell code, the definition of _=>_ is too limited compared to ->, since it doesn't support dependent functions. When adapting code from Haskell, that's a standard necessary change if you want to apply your abstractions to the functions you can write in Agda.

Moreover, by the usual convention of the standard library, this typeclass would be called RawArrow because to implement it you do not need to provide proofs that your instance satisfies the arrow laws; see RawFunctor and RawMonad for other examples (note: definitions of Functor and Monad are nowhere in sight in the standard library, as of version 0.7).

Here's a more powerful variant, which I wrote and tested with Agda 2.3.2 and the 0.7 standard library (should also work on version 0.6). Note that I only changed the type declaration of RawArrow's parameter and of _=>_, the rest is unchanged. When creating fnArrow, though, not all alternative type declarations work as before.

Warning: I only checked that the code typechecks and that => can be used sensibly, I didn't check whether examples using RawArrow typecheck.

module RawArrow where

open import Data.Product --actually needed by RawArrow
open import Data.Fin     --only for examples
open import Data.Nat     --ditto

record RawArrow (A : (S : Set) → (T : {s : S} → Set) → Set) : Set₁ where
  field  
    arr    : ∀ {B C} → (B → C) → A B C
    _>>>_  : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A C D → A B D
    first  : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A (B × D) (C × D)
    second : ∀ {B C D} → A B C → A (D × B) (D × C)
    _***_  : ∀ {B C B' C'} → A B C → A B' C' → A (B × B') (C × C')
    _&&&_  : ∀ {B C C'} → A B C → A B C' → A B (C × C')

_=>_ : (S : Set) → (T : {s : S} → Set) → Set
A => B = (a : A) -> B {a}

test1 : Set
test1 = ℕ => ℕ
-- With → we can also write:
test2 : Set
test2 = (n : ℕ) → Fin n
-- But also with =>, though it's more cumbersome:
test3 : Set
test3 = ℕ => (λ {n : ℕ} → Fin n)
--Note that since _=>_ uses Set instead of being level-polymorphic, it's still
--somewhat limited. But I won't go the full way.

--fnRawArrow : RawArrow _=>_
-- Alternatively:
fnRawArrow : RawArrow (λ A B → (a : A) → B {a})

fnRawArrow = record
  { arr    = λ f → f
  ; _>>>_  = λ g f x → f (g x)
  ; first  = λ { f (x , y) → (f x , y) }
  ; second = λ { f (x , y) → (x , f y) }
  ; _***_  = λ { f g (x , y) → (f x , g y) }
  ; _&&&_  = λ f g x → (f x , g x)
  }
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