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I've been crunching through Kernighan and Ritchie "The C Programming Language" and read that x mod y == x & y-1. So, I worked it out with pencil and paper, and worked fine, so then I tried to test it and here is the problem:

Code:

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
  int i, j;

  for(i = 1; i < 10; i++){
    for(j = 1; j < 10; j++)
      printf("%3d",i & j-1);
    printf("\n");
  }
}

Gives the output:

  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  0
  0  0  2  2  0  0  2  2  0
  0  1  2  3  0  1  2  3  0
  0  0  0  0  4  4  4  4  0
  0  1  0  1  4  5  4  5  0
  0  0  2  2  4  4  6  6  0
  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  0
  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  8
  0  1  0  1  0  1  0  1  8

and

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
  int i, j;

  for(i = 1; i < 10; i++){
    for(j = 1; j < 10; j++)
      printf("%3d",i % j);
    printf("\n");
  }
}

gives the output:

  0  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1
  0  0  2  2  2  2  2  2  2
  0  1  0  3  3  3  3  3  3
  0  0  1  0  4  4  4  4  4
  0  1  2  1  0  5  5  5  5
  0  0  0  2  1  0  6  6  6
  0  1  1  3  2  1  0  7  7
  0  0  2  0  3  2  1  0  8
  0  1  0  1  4  3  2  1  0

Notice, the only change was the % that became &. Any input would be much appreciated

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closed as too localized by H2CO3, mnel, Andrew Marshall, brenjt, K Mehta Oct 29 '12 at 4:06

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No, that's not the only change: i & j-1 => i % j (explicitly: j-1 => j). –  Andrew Marshall Oct 29 '12 at 3:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The equation

x mod y == x & y-1

is only correct for y a power of 2.

If y = 2^k, the binary representaion of y is one 1-bit followed by k 0-bits (and preceded by a number of 0-bits depending on the width of the type), and the representation of y-1 is k 1-bits (preceded by 0s).

Then if you write x = q*y + r with 0 <= r < y, the binary representation of r needs at most k bits, and the last k bits of q*y are all 0, so the remainder of x modulo y consists of the least significant k bits of x, which are obtained by the bitwise and with y-1.

For an odd y > 1, y-1 is even, and so x & y-1 is always even, hence (y+1) % y == 1 != (y+1) & (y-1). For even y not a power of 2, replace 1 with the power of 2 corresponding to the lowest set bit of y in y+1.

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Thank you, I just realized rows 2, 4 , 8 were congruent. –  Seth Kania Oct 28 '12 at 20:51

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