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I want to get every permutation of my list's elements. I'm trying to do it by shuffling these elements between two lists and checking iterations of list2.

Something is wrong though. Can you help me to get right solution to my problem?

void iterlist(list<int>& Lit)
{
    list<int>::iterator it;

    for (it=Lit.begin(); it!=Lit.end(); it++)
        cout << " " << *it;

    cout << endl;
}

void permutations(list<int>& L1, list<int>& L2)
{
    L2.push_back(L1.front());
    L1.pop_front();

    if(!L1.empty())
    {
        permutations(L1, L2);
    }

    L1.push_back(L2.back());
    L2.pop_back();

    iterlist(L2);
}

I was testing it for elements of L1 = 1,2,3,4,5, and the only permutations I get are: 1 2 3 4 5 and 5 4 3 2 1.

share|improve this question
    
You're code doesn't compile (ex. see LU at the tail of your permutations function). Also, you may want to reflect on one of the key properties of recursive algorithms: using the stack to hold recursive state, and what you may be doing wrong that is causing that to fail. –  WhozCraig Oct 28 '12 at 21:05
    
I forgot to change name of argument, now it does compile in VS2010 : ] –  pawel Oct 28 '12 at 21:09
    
Craig is right... 1>.\test.cpp(31) : error C2065: 'LU' : undeclared identifier –  Caribou Oct 28 '12 at 21:12
3  
Have you looked at std::next_permutation? –  Peter Wood Oct 28 '12 at 21:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A general algorithm for recursively generating permutations of N-length from a list of N items is:

For each element x in list

  • Make a copy of list without element x; call it newList
  • Find all of the permutations of newList (thats the recursion, btw)
  • Add element x to the beginning of each permutation of newList

There are other ways of doing this, but this one I have consistently found the easiest for people learning recursion to wrap their heads around. The method you appear to be using involves storing the iterative loop portion of the algorithm in a second list, which is perfectly fine, but I warn you the algorithm for managing order-swapping is not immediately intuitive when doing that (as you'll no-doubt discover in due time).

The following demonstrates the general algorithm (and not particularly efficiently, but you can get the general idea from it).

#include <iostream>
#include <list>

typedef std::list<int> IntList;
void iterlist(IntList& lst)
{
    for (IntList::iterator it=lst.begin(); it!=lst.end(); it++)
        cout << " " << *it;
    cout << endl;
}

std::list<IntList> permute(IntList& L1)
{
    if (L1.size() == 1)
        return std::list<IntList>(1,L1);

    std::list<IntList> res;
    for (IntList::iterator i = L1.begin(); i != L1.end();)
    {
        // remember this
        int x = (*i);

        // make a list without the current element
        IntList tmp(L1.begin(), i++);
        tmp.insert(tmp.end(), i, L1.end());

        // recurse to get all sub-permutations
        std::list<IntList> sub = permute(tmp);

        // amend sub-permutations by adding the element
        for (std::list<IntList>::iterator j=sub.begin(); j!=sub.end();j++)
            (*j).push_front(x);

        // finally append modified results to our running collection.
        res.insert(res.begin(), sub.begin(), sub.end());
    }
    return res;
}

int main()
{
    IntList lst;
    for (int i=0;i<4;i++)
        lst.push_back(i);
    std::list<IntList> res = permute(lst);
    for (std::list<IntList>::iterator i=res.begin(); i!=res.end(); i++)
        iterlist(*i);
    return 0;
}

Produces the following output, all permutations of 0..3:

 3 2 1 0
 3 2 0 1
 3 1 2 0
 3 1 0 2
 3 0 2 1
 3 0 1 2
 2 3 1 0
 2 3 0 1
 2 1 3 0
 2 1 0 3
 2 0 3 1
 2 0 1 3
 1 3 2 0
 1 3 0 2
 1 2 3 0
 1 2 0 3
 1 0 3 2
 1 0 2 3
 0 3 2 1
 0 3 1 2
 0 2 3 1
 0 2 1 3
 0 1 3 2
 0 1 2 3
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, works great! Thank you! : ) –  pawel Oct 29 '12 at 8:37

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