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I currently have a method right now that looks like the following:

public void foo(Date date) {
    PreparedStatement stmt; 
    ResultSet rs;
    java.sql.Date sDate = new java.sql.Date(date.getTime());

    try {
        String sql = "select * from some_table p where p.start_date <=? and ?<= p.end_date";
        stmt = getConnection().preparedStatement(sql);
        stmt.setDate(1, sDate);
        stmt.setDate(2, sDate);
        rs = stmt.executeQuery();
        //... 
    } finally {
        if (rs != null) { rs.close(); }
        if (stmt != null) { stmt.close(); }
    }
}

Now instead of passing one Date object, I would like to pass in list of date (List<Date> dates). I guess I technically can call foo multiple times, while iterating through the list, but is there a way I can achieve this without having to call foo multiple times?

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Can we apply <= on multiple dates? I guess query should be IN instead of <= if you would like to do range query, isn't it? I may be wrong too. –  Nambari Oct 28 '12 at 21:18
    
you have to call it multiple times –  case1352 Oct 28 '12 at 21:20
    
So is iteration my only option? –  student Oct 28 '12 at 21:21
    
I think you should modify your query condition to check for range instead of trying to pass in list of dates. You are not telling us what exactly you are trying to achieve ultimately. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 28 '12 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of passing a single Date object, consider passing an ArrayList of Date objects to your foo(...) method and working with that.

The you 've a couple of options to work with.

Option 1: Execute your PreparedStatement multiple times by changing the parameters

public void foo(ArrayList<Date> dateList) {
    if(dateList == null)
        return;

    PreparedStatement stmt = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;    
    java.sql.Date sDate = null;
    try{
        stmt = getConnection().preparedStatement("select * from some_table p where p.start_date <=? and ?<= p.end_date");

        for(Date date: dateList){
            try{
                sDate = new java.sql.Date(date.getTime());
                stmt.clearParameters(); //Clear current parameter values
                stmt.setDate(1, sDate);
                stmt.setDate(2, sDate);
                rs = stmt.executeQuery();

                //perform your operations
            }finally{
                sDate = null;
                //mange your resultset closing
            }
        }
    }finally{
        //your resource management code
    }  
}

Option 2: Create a SQL query taking into account the number of dates you've in your list, execute this statement and then work with the resultset.

public void foo(ArrayList<Date> dateList) {
    if(dateList == null)
        return;

    PreparedStatement stmt = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;    
    java.sql.Date sDate = null;
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    try{
        //1. Create your dynamic statement
        builder.append("SELECT * FROM some_table p WHERE \n");
        for(int index = 0; index < dateList.length; index++){
            if(index > 0)
                builder.append(" OR \n");
            builder.append("(p.start_date <=? and ?<= p.end_date)");
        }

        stmt = getConnection().preparedStatement(builder.toString());

        //2. Set the parameters
        int index = 1;
        for(Date date: dateList){
            try{
                sDate = new java.sql.Date(date.getTime());
                stmt.setDate(index, sDate);
                stmt.setDate(index+1, sDate);
                index += 2;
            }finally{
                sDate = null;
                //mange your resultset closing
            }
        }

        //3. execute your query
        rs = stmt.executeQuery();

        //4. perform your operations
    }finally{
        builder = null;
        //your resource management code
    }

}
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1  
@alexispigeon - woops, didn't see that mix-up. Thanks for the edit :) –  Sujay Oct 28 '12 at 22:00

This is a solution using only one database call. This doesn't check for null or empty dateList, on the contrary it assumes there is at least one element.

public void foo(List<Date> dateList) {
    PreparedStatement stmt; 
    ResultSet rs;

    try {
        // Step 1 : build the query string, based on the number of elements in the list
        StringBuilder sql = new StringBuilder("select * from some_table p where (p.start_date <=? and ?<= p.end_date)");
        if (dateList.size() > 1) {
            for (int i = 1; i < dateList.size(); i++) {
                sql.append(" or (p.start_date <=? and ?<= p.end_date)");
            }
        }

        stmt = getConnection().preparedStatement(sql.toString());

        // Step 2 : pass the actual list of dates to the query
        for (int i = 0; i < dateList.size(); i++) {
            java.sql.Date date = new java.sql.Date(dateList.get(i).getTime());
            stmt.setDate((i * 2) + 1, date);
            stmt.setDate((i * 2) + 2, date);
        }

        rs = stmt.executeQuery();
        //... 
    } finally {
        if (rs != null) { rs.close(); }
        if (stmt != null) { stmt.close(); }
    }
}
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