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This is cross-posted from the coursera functional programming course because there's a lot less activity on that forum.

I wrote the following code (parts are redacted because it's homework):

type Occurrences = List[(Char, Int)]
def subtract(x: Occurrences, y: Occurrences): Occurrences = {
  val mx: Map[Char, Int] = x toMap
  y.foldLeft (redacted) (redacted => simple expression using updated and -)) toList
}

This produces the following compile error:

type mismatch; found : Map[Char,Int] required: <:<[(Char, Int), (?, ?)]

However if I add a copy of the third line, without the toList, in between via a val statement, the error goes away:

type Occurrences = List[(Char, Int)]
def subtract(x: Occurrences, y: Occurrences): Occurrences = {
  val mx: Map[Char, Int] = x toMap
  val foo: Map[Char, Int] = y.foldLeft (redacted) (redacted => simple expression using updated and -))
  y.foldLeft (redacted) (redacted => simple expression using updated and -)) toList
}

I'm guessing this has something to do with giving some kind of extra hint to the type checker, but does anyone know specifically why this happens?

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1  
Why a downvote with no comment? –  jonderry Oct 28 '12 at 21:49
7  
It thinks the y.foldLeft is an argument to toMap (replacing the normal implicit that specifies the type). Add a semicolon after toMap and you should be fine. –  Rex Kerr Oct 28 '12 at 21:53
6  
or just put a dot : x.toMap –  Didier Dupont Oct 28 '12 at 22:00
3  
I don't understand neither the close vote, nor the downvote. I think the question is interesting and fits SO. It illustrates well semi-colon inference problems with postfix operators. –  paradigmatic Oct 28 '12 at 22:12
1  
I agree it's too localized but I also believe it can be improved. It's too localized because @jonderry didn't try to extract a minimum working sample from this code. –  pedrofurla Oct 28 '12 at 22:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Below follows a few examples and some explanations on why it happens.

First, a working and a non-working cases:

scala> { List('a -> 1, 'b -> 2).toMap
     | println("aaa") }
aaa

scala> { List('a -> 1, 'b -> 2) toMap
     | println("aaa") }
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Unit
 required: <:<[(Symbol, Int),(?, ?)]
              println("aaa") }
                     ^

This happens because the syntax "obj method arg" is considered to be "obj.method(arg)" and so is "obj method \n arg", this way the argument can be written in the next line. Notice below:

scala> { val x = List('a -> 1, 'b -> 2) map 
     | identity
     | 
     | println(x) }
List(('a,1), ('b,2))

It's the same as List('a -> 1, 'b -> 2).map(identity).

Now for the weird error message found : Unit, required: <:<[(Symbol, Int),(?, ?)]. It happens that toMap actually takes one argument, here is it's signature:

def toMap[T, U](implicit ev: <:<[A,(T, U)]): Map[T,U],

but it's an implicit argument, so doesn't need to be provided explicitly in this case. But when you use the obj method \n arg syntax it fills the method argument. In the above non-working example the argument is println which has type Unit, hence it is not accepted by the compiler.

One workaround is to have two \n to separate the lines:

scala> { List('a -> 1, 'b -> 2) toMap
     | 
     | println("aaa") }
aaa

You can also use a ; to separate the lines.

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@RexKerr & @DidierDupont are right, you're having issues because you called toMap like a binary operator, so the compiler freaked out.

My two cents: you should probably read the Suffix Notation section of the Scala Style Guide.

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